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I have an external database that is feeding information to me. One saves their data as native GUID format and my other data source supplies standard .NET GUID format string.

Is there a tidy way to convert from Native GUID to GUID Structure?

Also is there any validation bit to determine if a provided value is a Native GUID or not? I can't seem to find any if there is one.

The difference is as follows:

typedef struct _GUID 
{  
   DWORD Data1;  
   WORD Data2;  
   WORD Data3;  
   BYTE Data4[8];
} GUID;

Data1, Data2 and Data3 get their byte order reversed but Data4 remains the same, see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Globally_unique_identifier for more info

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1  
Sorry, clueless - what's the difference? Isn't a GUID just 16 bytes of data either way? –  Rup Nov 9 '11 at 11:58
1  
The first 8 bytes of a GUID can change their byte endianness, but there doesn't seem to be a clean way in .NET to accept data that has this reversed order. For more info: stackoverflow.com/questions/1644989/… –  Seph Nov 9 '11 at 12:03
    
Thanks, I'd never seen that. I'd assumed the endianness was mandated like IP stuff. I think it'd be simplest to write your own parser for the hex string for the native case then. –  Rup Nov 9 '11 at 12:07
1  
Bit order reversal seems very unlikely. Byte order is possible but still a stretch. Ultimately it is up to the data provider you use to make this conversion. Contact the vendor for support. Don't discount the possibility of a bug in whatever viewer you use to look at the dbase table. –  Hans Passant Nov 9 '11 at 12:44

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If I understand the question correctly, I posted extension methods that do this in How to read a .NET Guid into a Java UUID.

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To see if the input is in little Endian or not BitConverter.IsLittleEndinan() helps.

I just had to do this same thing and using Paul Smith's answer above I got it working with this code. Derived off his code but with a fix on last byte swap order and condensed to one flip. (guid.FlipEndian().FlipEndian() == guid):

C# Code:

public static class Extensions
{
    /// <summary>
    /// A CLSCompliant method to convert a big-endian Guid to little-endian
    /// and vice versa.
    /// The Guid Constructor (UInt32, UInt16, UInt16, Byte, Byte, Byte, Byte,
    ///  Byte, Byte, Byte, Byte) is not CLSCompliant.
    /// </summary>
    [CLSCompliant(true)]
    public static Guid FlipEndian(this Guid guid)
    {
        var newBytes = new byte[16];
        var oldBytes = guid.ToByteArray();

        for (var i = 8; i < 16; i++)
            newBytes[i] = oldBytes[i];

        newBytes[3] = oldBytes[0];
        newBytes[2] = oldBytes[1];
        newBytes[1] = oldBytes[2];
        newBytes[0] = oldBytes[3];
        newBytes[5] = oldBytes[4];
        newBytes[4] = oldBytes[5];
        newBytes[6] = oldBytes[7];
        newBytes[7] = oldBytes[6];

        return new Guid(newBytes);
    }
}

VB.net code (Translated from online service):

Public NotInheritable Class Extensions
    Private Sub New()
    End Sub
    ''' <summary>
    ''' A CLSCompliant method to convert a big-endian Guid to little-endian
    ''' and vice versa.
    ''' The Guid Constructor (UInt32, UInt16, UInt16, Byte, Byte, Byte, Byte,
    '''  Byte, Byte, Byte, Byte) is not CLSCompliant.
    ''' </summary>
    <CLSCompliant(True)> _
    <System.Runtime.CompilerServices.Extension> _
    Public Shared Function FlipEndian(guid As Guid) As Guid
        Dim newBytes = New Byte(15) {}
        Dim oldBytes = guid.ToByteArray()

        For i As var = 8 To 15
            newBytes(i) = oldBytes(i)
        Next

        newBytes(3) = oldBytes(0)
        newBytes(2) = oldBytes(1)
        newBytes(1) = oldBytes(2)
        newBytes(0) = oldBytes(3)
        newBytes(5) = oldBytes(4)
        newBytes(4) = oldBytes(5)
        newBytes(6) = oldBytes(7)
        newBytes(7) = oldBytes(6)

        Return New Guid(newBytes)
    End Function
End Class
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If in fact you are dealing with Endian issues, you'll have no choice but to parse the string yourself into the constituent parts of the Guid switch the Endianness, and then create a Guid that you would then use.

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I suppose I'll have to write my own wrapper to reverse the values –  Seph Nov 9 '11 at 14:32

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