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I have a very strange bug that I can't explain. It occurs when I combine python and sqlite. I have a table that contains a REAL field called stop_lat. When I run the following code:

c = conn.cursor()
c.execute("select stop_lat from stops;")
for (stop_lat, ) in c:
    print stop_lat
    print type(stop_lat)
    stop_lat = int(stop_lat*1000)

I get the following output

stop_lat
<type 'unicode'>
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "./extract_data_tools/extract_trips.py", line 47, in <module>
    stop_lat = int(stop_lat*1000)
ValueError: invalid literal for int() with base 10: 'stop_latstop_latstop_latstop_latstop_latstop_latstop_latstop_latstop_latstop_latstop_latstop_latstop_latstop_latstop_latstop_latstop_latstop_latstop_latstop_latstop_latstop_latstop_latstop_latstop_lat'

Now when I comment out the last line, meaning I execute

c = conn.cursor()
c.execute("select stop_lat from stops;")
for (stop_lat, ) in c:
    print stop_lat
    print type(stop_lat)
    #stop_lat = int(stop_lat*1000)

I get the following output:

37.743804
<type 'float'>
37.780889
<type 'float'>
37.772006
<type 'float'>
37.723433
<type 'float'>
37.783026
<type 'float'>
...

Meaning the type of stop_lat depends on whether I pass it to int... that does not really make any sense to me. It even gets stranger. The following code

c = conn.cursor()
c.execute("select stop_lat from stops;")
for (stop_lat, ) in c:
    print stop_lat
    print type(stop_lat)
    stop_lat = stop_lat*1000
    print stop_lat
    print type(stop_lat)

outputs

37.780889
<type 'float'>
37780.889
<type 'float'>
37.772006
<type 'float'>
37772.006
<type 'float'>
37.723433
<type 'float'>
37723.433
<type 'float'>
37.783026
<type 'float'>
37783.026
<type 'float'>
...

Can anyone explain to me what is going on here? I can not reproduce the problem without sqlite being in the game (i.e. Code literals work as expected).

share|improve this question
    
Can you create a minimal script that reproduces the error? You can use an in-memory database to make it self-contained. –  Björn Pollex Nov 9 '11 at 12:27
    
I found the bug... sqlite does not enforce the real constraint when reading in csv data meaning it ducktypes. Instead of using the name of columns in the first row to figure out which data should go into which column it put a row into the table that contained the column name "stop_lat" as a string in a column marked as real. As Python also duck types the error propagates into the python code and as there is only a single invalid row entry I did not catch it when looking at the debug output... I hate duck typing! –  user963395 Nov 9 '11 at 15:56
    
You can post that as an answer and accept it (it is OK to answer your own questions). As a side-note, you should read this page. Creating a minimal example is very useful for debugging, and you also make sure that all relevant information is included in your question (which was not the case here, as it turns out). –  Björn Pollex Nov 10 '11 at 7:27
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1 Answer 1

It looks to me like more is changing that the commented out line.

The first SQL statement appears to be running, select "stop_lat" from stops and the other running without quotes: select stop_lat from stops.

share|improve this answer
    
Indeed. This may have been also caused by some custom types (or overriding float class?), but in this case it seems just strange. –  Tadeck Nov 9 '11 at 12:31
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