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I have lot of c files in a directory. Each files will start with multi line comment like below and starts with include like

#include<stdio.h>. 

   // This is a c File

   // This File does sampling the frequency

   /* This uses the logic ...
   .....
   .....
   */

#include<stdio.h>

I need to remove all the comments line at the start of all the .c files if they are present. Some files will not have these comment lines. In that case, it should not do anything. This should remove only the first multi line comments. Subsequent multi line comments should be as it is.

How to do this in perl or shell?

Thanks in advance

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1  
The head line does not match the question content? –  hfs Nov 9 '11 at 14:03
    
Important missing information: That first #include was not in your original, I assume it is an editor mistake? What rule for "first comment" applies? Comments before any #include statements? –  TLP Nov 9 '11 at 15:47
    
How would you determine the case "It's not there"? It seems that you would always have to look ahead to see whether there was a #include to know whether or not you wanted to delete a multi-line comment. And who ever thought of putting includes BEFORE documentation. –  Axeman Nov 9 '11 at 16:23
2  
Removing a bunch of copyright notices? –  Bill Ruppert Nov 9 '11 at 17:08
    
Yes... kind of.. –  Raj Nov 10 '11 at 5:40

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted
#!/usr/bin/env perl
use strict;
use warnings;
my $skipping = 0;
while (<>) {
    m{^\s*//}           and next;
    m{^\s*/\*.*\*/\s*$} and next;
    if ( m{^\s*/\*} ) {
        $skipping = 1;
        next;
    }
    if ( m{^\s*\*/} ) {
        $skipping = 0;
        next;
    }
    next if $skipping;
    print;
}

...or alternatively:

#!/usr/bin/env perl
use strict;
use warnings;
while (<>) {
    next if      m{^\s*//};
    next if      m{^\s*/\*.*\*/\s*$};
    next while ( m{^\s*/\*}..m{^\s*\*/} );
    print;
}

...AND if you only want to do this for the first multi-line comment, change the match delimiters of the range from curly braces to the "?" character, to read like this:

next while ( m?^\s*/\*?..m?^\s*\*/? );
share|improve this answer
    
I want to do this only for first multi line comment. The subsequent multiple commands should be prsent as it is –  Raj Nov 9 '11 at 15:06
    
@Raj : See the edited solution above. –  JRFerguson Nov 9 '11 at 15:43
    
To be on the safe side create the new files in a different directory. –  Itamar Nov 9 '11 at 16:07

If you are sure that all files start with an include, you could remove all lines before the import:

perl -i -ne 'print if /^#include/..0' *.c
share|improve this answer
    
How to execute this command from shell script? –  Raj Nov 9 '11 at 15:20
    
I want to do this in a loop in the shell script –  Raj Nov 9 '11 at 15:21
    
-n command line option is a loop. It uses an implicit while (<>) loop around the script. –  TLP Nov 9 '11 at 15:41
    
You don't need a loop. *.c says all c files and with -n option, perl reads the entire file with an implicit while loop –  Aki Nov 9 '11 at 16:45
    
@Aki You forgot to mention that the -n option uses an implicit while loop. –  TLP Nov 9 '11 at 22:28

I had a pretty easy solution, if #include could be considered a stopper:

use strict;
use warnings;
use English qw<$RS>;
use English qw<@LAST_MATCH_START>;

*::STDIN = *DATA{IO};
my $old_rs = $RS;
local $RS = "*/";
local $_;

while ( <> ) { 
    if ( m{/[*](?:.(?!:[*]/))*\n(?sm-ix:.(?!:[*]/))*[*]/}m ) {
        substr( $_, $LAST_MATCH_START[0] ) = '';
        print;
        last;
    }
    print;
    last if m/^\s*#include\b/m;
}
$RS = $old_rs;
print while <>;

__DATA__
##include<stdio.h>. 

   // This is a c File

   // This File does sampling the frequency

   /* A mline comment not multi */

   /* This uses the logic ...
   .....
   .....
   */

#include<stdio.h>

Notice that I had to change the initial #include so that the script works. It seemed simple to me that if I wanted multi-line comments, the simplest solution was to make '*/' my record separator, instead of doing a lot of switching on the individual lines.

But the lookahead, requires buffering and made a messier solution:

use strict;
use warnings;
use English qw<$RS>;
use English qw<@LAST_MATCH_START>;

*::STDIN = *DATA{IO};
my $old_rs = $RS;
local $RS = "*/";
local $_;

my ( $rin, $rie );
my $mline = '';
my $buffer;

while ( <> ) { 
    if ( m{/[*](?:.(?!:[*]/))*\n(?sm-ix:.(?!:[*]/))*[*]/}m ) {
        my $split = $LAST_MATCH_START[0];
        print substr( $_, 0, $split );
        $mline = substr( $_, $split );
        last;
    }
    print;
}
$RS = $old_rs;
while ( <> ) { 
    $buffer .= $_;
    if ( /^\s*#include\b/ ) { 
        $mline = '';
        last;
    }
}
print $mline, $buffer;
print while <>;

__DATA__
#include<stdio.h>. 

   // This is a c File

   // This File does sampling the frequency

   /* A mutli-line comment not on multiple lines */

   /* This uses the logic ...
   .....
   .....
   */

#include<stdio.h>
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