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i'm using visual studio 2003 and i have a c++ application using microsoft STL that have a memory error :

the code was :

instrcutions;
function1();
function2();
...
functionN();

i modify it :

list<A*> l1;
instrcutions;
function1();
function2();
...
functionN();

in execution in debug mode, i see the size of the list growing, become smaller and the data the list point changes of coourse.

as the functions "don't know" the list exist, the list can't be modified in purpose. i tried changing the name of the list : the same behaviour occurs.

any idea of what can cause this trouble, where to search in the code, and maybe free tools to track wrong memory access.

can someone confirm that visual studio can not detect wrong memory access as i described ?

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1  
In Linux, you can and should use valgrind. If your code is portable, you can just compile it with GCC on a Linux machine and test it for errors there. Note that having a container whose element type is a pointer is an open invitation for trouble, and you have to write this sort of code very carefully. –  Kerrek SB Nov 9 '11 at 14:07
    
Shouldn't this be tagged visual-c++ if it is Visual Studio specific? –  bitmask Nov 9 '11 at 14:32
    
"element type is a pointer is an open invitation for trouble, and you have to write this sort of code very carefully." the code is full of it !... –  Hicham from CppDepend Team Nov 9 '11 at 15:26
    
there some windows dlls(I don't have the code of them) and thousands of lines of code specific to visual c++. I don't think it is easily possible to make it work in linux. –  Hicham from CppDepend Team Nov 9 '11 at 15:29

5 Answers 5

The size of the list should not be affected by any of the functions unless you pass a refrence or a pointer to the list to some of the functions. Also what you describe is not the general way in which memory issues exhibit themselves. The list decreasing in good order is an indication of undesired use of functionality of the list a memory issue would cause a crash the list to be null for no reason or some other type of "weird" issue.

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"The list decreasing in good order is an indication of undesired use of functionality of the list ". you mean that the code handle the memory where is stored l1 as a list (even if this mmemory is not allocated)? stranger, I created another list l2 in the same place of the program, the same thing happens to l2 ! –  Hicham from CppDepend Team Nov 9 '11 at 14:30

Ask yourself the following questions:

  1. Are the pointers being stored in the list pointing to objects on the heap or on the stack?
  2. Are you deleteing or freeing the pointers in the list, and do allocations match deallocations?
  3. Do you really need pointers or can you just use value types?

You could use shared_ptr instead of a raw pointer if you are having trouble with keeping track of #2 (make sure you don't have cyclic references though).

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I do not touch the list ! that s the wierd thing. it remains empty. the only instruction that uses the list its the declaration "list<A*> l1;" I need pointers... in addition to this problem, there is other lists pointing structs in the heap that are modified also without calling them explicitly. –  Hicham from CppDepend Team Nov 9 '11 at 14:20
    
But you said: "in execution in debug mode, i see the size of the list growing, become smaller and the data the list point changes of coourse." How is that possible if you didn't touch it? –  Wood Nov 12 '11 at 17:46
    
Are you doing pointer arithmetic with pointers pointing to the stack? If so, the bug will be in that code. –  Wood Nov 12 '11 at 17:47
    
" How is that possible if you didn't touch it?" this is the terrible question !!! i can declare another list in the same function. it is also modified without beeing "touched" by the code !! –  Hicham from CppDepend Team Nov 13 '11 at 0:55
    
"Are you doing pointer arithmetic with pointers pointing to the stack?" no –  Hicham from CppDepend Team Nov 13 '11 at 0:55

I'm not sure I understand your question - are you modifying the list at all? Passing it to any functions?

If you're sure you are overwriting memory somewhere, try using the _heapchk() function while running in debug mode. I've successfully used it for detecting memory overwrites by wrapping important statements with std::couts and calls to _heapchk():

std::cout << "Loc 0" << std::endl;
callFunction(parameter);
_heapchk();
std::cout << "Loc 1" << std::endl;

This may help you locate where in your code the memory overwrite occurs, but not why.

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nope : no modifying it and no passing it to any function. thx for _heapchk() –  Hicham from CppDepend Team Nov 9 '11 at 14:30

The list's content is pointers to Objects of type A however.. this is a guess because your problem seems very general, have you thought about that the list object isnt a pointer so when your creating your objects to pass into the list object. That the list object no longer exists because you have push it further down on the stack. Perhaps make your list object..

 list<A*>* l1;
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it is supposed to contain pointers to structures. –  Hicham from CppDepend Team Nov 9 '11 at 14:35
    
making a list objects : list<A> l1; works fine. but i need list<A*> l1; because of polymorphism. in need to put substructures in the list. –  Hicham from CppDepend Team Nov 9 '11 at 14:37
    
but overall, this problem signals a memory error of some king of error that have to be solved. –  Hicham from CppDepend Team Nov 9 '11 at 14:38
    
Memory error, are by any chance are you trying to access element in your list that dont exist. You know that when you do list<A*> your not creating any objects your just creating pointers to objects. So all you have at the moment is a cup that is empty and you are trying to get water out of the cup. But there isnt any, so this will give you a memory error. So what you need to do is every time you want to add a new object to your list put: list<A*> cup; //This is an empty cup A* water1 = new A(); cup.push_front(water1); –  Chris Condy Nov 9 '11 at 14:46
    
i know. it is what i do for other lists. –  Hicham from CppDepend Team Nov 9 '11 at 15:10

list l1; as far as i remember list contains it's size for fast .size() function work, this can be used.

I just don't remember whether vs2003 supports breakpoints on memory write. VS2005 - definitely does.

So the idea: get address of 'size' member inside the list (find it by opening header file) and set the breakpoint on data change. You will catch violator in any case then, nevertheless it's usual hidden push_back or write to a random stack memory where std::list object itself presents.

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