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I have a large 2D numpy array for which I know a pair of indices which represent one element of the array. I want to set this element and the surrounding 20X20 area equal to zero; I have attempted using a slicing technique:

      s = array[x:10,y:10]
      s == 0

however although x and y are previously defined, this is an 'invalid slice'

I would appreciate any suggestions as to how I can accomplish this as I am new to python.

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4 Answers

my_array[x - 10:x + 10, y - 10:y + 10] = 0

or

s = my_array[x - 10:x + 10, y - 10:y + 10]
s[:] = 0
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TypeError: unsupported operand type(s) for -: 'list' and 'int' although this seems the correct method of slicing –  Candace Adams Nov 9 '11 at 14:41
    
@CandaceAdams: Then either x or y are a list instead of an integer. –  Sven Marnach Nov 9 '11 at 14:43
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I believe you mean array[x:x+10,y:y+10]

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thanks, I tried this and it results in the following error; TypeError: can only concatenate list (not "int") to list –  Candace Adams Nov 9 '11 at 14:34
    
what are x and y? I assumed they integers indicating the top/left corner index? If you already have x and y has like beg/end index, you need something like array[x[0]:x[1]+1,y[0]:y[1]+1]. Also as other answers pointed out, the above soln capture 10x10 subarray. –  yosukesabai Nov 9 '11 at 15:00
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You select multiple elements of an array A with A[start:stop] where start and stop are zero-based indices.
For a 2D Array this applies as well: A[start1:stop1, start2:stop2].

With the following script

import numpy as np

A = np.ones((5,5))

A looks like this

[[ 1.  1.  1.  1.  1.]
 [ 1.  1.  1.  1.  1.]
 [ 1.  1.  1.  1.  1.]
 [ 1.  1.  1.  1.  1.]
 [ 1.  1.  1.  1.  1.]]

with

A[1:4,1:4] = 0

you get

[[ 1.  1.  1.  1.  1.]
 [ 1.  0.  0.  0.  1.]
 [ 1.  0.  0.  0.  1.]
 [ 1.  0.  0.  0.  1.]
 [ 1.  1.  1.  1.  1.]]
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Note that for the block of zeros to be centered on your x,y coordinates, it must be of odd size. For instance, the block of zeros in the following is not centered the coordinates x,y = 4,6 but on the center coordinates of that cell, that is x, y = 4.5, 5.5:

import numpy

a = numpy.ones((10,10))
x,y = 4,6
s = 2
a[x - s: x + s, y-s: y + s] = 0

array([[ 1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  1.],
       [ 1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  1.],
       [ 1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  1.,  1.],
       [ 1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  1.,  1.],
       [ 1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  1.,  1.],
       [ 1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  1.,  1.],
       [ 1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  1.],
       [ 1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  1.],
       [ 1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  1.],
       [ 1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  1.]])

whereas this one is:

a = numpy.ones((10,10))
x,y = 4,6
s = 2
a[x - s: x + s + 1, y-s: y + s + 1] = 0
print a

array([[ 1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  1.],
       [ 1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  1.],
       [ 1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  1.],
       [ 1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  1.],
       [ 1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  1.],
       [ 1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  1.],
       [ 1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  1.],
       [ 1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  1.],
       [ 1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  1.],
       [ 1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  1.]])

If the script is for pixel based image processing, this could be an important distinction.

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