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I have a method for getting users from a database with JDBC:

public List<User> getUser(int userId) {
    String sql = "SELECT id, name FROM users WHERE id = ?";
    List<User> users = new ArrayList<User>();
    try {
        Connection con = DriverManager.getConnection(myConnectionURL);
        PreparedStatement ps = con.prepareStatement(sql); 
        ps.setInt(1, userId);
        ResultSet rs = ps.executeQuery();
        while(rs.next()) {
            users.add(new User(rs.getInt("id"), rs.getString("name")));
        }
        rs.close();
        ps.close();
        con.close();
    } catch (SQLException e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
    }
    return users;
}

How should I use Java 7 try-with-resources to improve this code?

I have tried with the code below, but it uses many try, and doesn't improve the readability much. Should I use try-with-resources in another way?

public List<User> getUser(int userId) {
    String sql = "SELECT id, name FROM users WHERE id = ?";
    List<User> users = new ArrayList<>();
    try {
        try (Connection con = DriverManager.getConnection(myConnectionURL);
             PreparedStatement ps = con.prepareStatement(sql);) {
            ps.setInt(1, userId);
            try (ResultSet rs = ps.executeQuery();) {
                while(rs.next()) {
                    users.add(new User(rs.getInt("id"), rs.getString("name")));
                }
            }
        }
    } catch (SQLException e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
    }
    return users;
}
share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 23 down vote accepted

There's no need for the outer try

public List<User> getUser(int userId) {
    String sql = "SELECT id, username FROM users WHERE id = ?";
    List<User> users = new ArrayList<>();
    try (Connection con = DriverManager.getConnection(myConnectionURL);
         PreparedStatement ps = con.prepareStatement(sql);) {
        ps.setInt(1, userId);
        try (ResultSet rs = ps.executeQuery();) {
            while(rs.next()) {
                users.add(new User(rs.getInt("id"), rs.getString("name")));
            }
        }
    } catch (SQLException e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
    }
    return users;
}
share|improve this answer

I realize this was long ago answered but want to suggest an additional approach that avoids the nested try block.

public T getUser(int userId) {
    try (Connection con = DriverManager.getConnection(myConnectionURL);
         PreparedStatement ps = createPreparedStatement(con, userId); 
         ResultSet rs = ps.executeQuery()) {

         return processResultSet(rs);
    } catch (SQLException e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
    }
    return users;
}

private PreparedStatement createPreparedStatement(Connection con, int userId) throws SQLException {
    String sql = "SELECT id, username FROM users WHERE id = ?";
    PreparedStatement ps = con.prepareStatement(sql);
    ps.setInt(1, userId);
    return ps;
}

private T processResultSet(ResultSet rs) { 
   // code
}
share|improve this answer
2  
Much neater. Thanks for the suggestion. :) –  Jules Apr 9 '13 at 14:23
    
When I tried this approach, Eclipse complained that the call to "con.prepareStatement" throws an unhandled exception (of type SQLException). Apparently a method called from the try-with-resources statement is not covered by the try block. –  Basil Bourque Apr 15 '13 at 20:56
3  
No, it is covered, the problem is that the code above is calling prepareStatement from inside a method which doesn't declare to throw SQLException. Also, the code above has at least one path where it can fail without closing the prepared statement (if an SQLException occurs while calling setInt.) –  Trejkaz May 8 '13 at 6:19
    
@Trejkaz good point on the possibility of not closing the PreparedStatement. I didn't think of that, but you are right! –  Jeanne Boyarsky May 9 '13 at 23:51
1  
@ArturoTena yes - the order is guaranteed –  Jeanne Boyarsky Sep 25 '13 at 0:05

What about creating an additional wrapper class?

package com.naveen.research.sql;

import java.sql.Connection;
import java.sql.PreparedStatement;
import java.sql.ResultSet;
import java.sql.SQLException;

public abstract class PreparedStatementWrapper implements AutoCloseable {

    protected PreparedStatement stat;

    public PreparedStatementWrapper(Connection con, String query, Object ... params) throws SQLException {
        this.stat = con.prepareStatement(query);
        this.prepareStatement(params);
    }

    protected abstract void prepareStatement(Object ... params) throws SQLException;

    public ResultSet executeQuery() throws SQLException {
        return this.stat.executeQuery();
    }

    public int executeUpdate() throws SQLException {
        return this.stat.executeUpdate();
    }

    @Override
    public void close() {
        try {
            this.stat.close();
        } catch (SQLException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }
}


Then in the calling class you can implement prepareStatement method as:



    try(Connection con = DriverManager.getConnection(JDBC_URL, prop);
                        PreparedStatementWrapper stat = new PreparedStatementWrapper(con, query, new Object[] {123L, "TEST"}) {
                            @Override
                            protected void prepareStatement(Object... params) throws SQLException {
                                stat.setLong(1, Long.class.cast(params[0]));
                                stat.setString(2, String.valueOf(params[1]));
                            }
                        };
                        ResultSet rs = stat.executeQuery();
                        ) {
                            while(rs.next()) 
                                System.out.println(String.format("%s, %s", rs.getString(2), rs.getString(1)));
                } catch(SQLException e) {
                    e.printStackTrace();
                }

share|improve this answer
2  
PreparedStatement already implements AutoClosable –  Peter Elliott Mar 12 '13 at 20:54
    
Nothing in the comment above ever says it doesn't. –  Trejkaz May 8 '13 at 6:21

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