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I have a requirement to display SharePoint fields as a footer on only certain pages, so this rules out a master page change, and I haven't had any success with plain-old HTML.

What I'm trying to display is the following code:

<SharePoint:DeveloperDashboard runat="server"/>
<div class="s4-notdlg" style="clear:both; background-color:orange; padding:10px">
<SharePoint:CreatedModifiedInfo ControlMode="Display" runat="server">
<CustomTemplate>        

<br>Page Contact: <SharePoint:FormField FieldName="Page Contact" runat="server" ControlMode="Display" DisableInputFieldLabel="True" />
        <br>Last modified on <SharePoint:FieldValue FieldName="Modified" runat="server" ControlMode="Display" DisableInputFieldLabel="True" />
        by <SharePoint:FormField FieldName="Author" runat="server" ControlMode="Display" DisableInputFieldLabel="True" />
        <br>Comments: <SharePoint:FormField FieldName="Check In Comment" runat="server" ControlMode="Display" DisableInputFieldLabel="True" />
        </CustomTemplate>           
        </SharePoint:CreatedModifiedInfo>
        </div>

When editing the page in Advanced Mode, no matter where I place the code, I break site definition. Is there a good place to insert this code in the page? Or does the Site Definition need to be changed.

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Breaking the Site Definition may not be what you are thinking. It is just saying to you that the page is not one of the 'defaults' anymore, as a way to identify what have been customized on the site.

Every edit you make on those pages are like that, so it is OK to get that message. You may also "reset to site definition" when you want to, but this is not usually very stable on my experience.

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