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I don't want to make it possible in my program to create an object without passing arguments to the constructor.

Is there a way?

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6 Answers 6

When you declare any other constructor, the compiler will not generate the default constructor for you. If you have specified a default no-argument constructor, you can make it private.

Remember that the compiler can automatically generate each of these 4 member functions for a class.

  • default no argument constructor
  • default destructor
  • copy constructor
  • assignment operator

But it will not generate a default one if you have declared one yourself, i.e., if you declared a constructor yourself, it will not create the default constructor. If you didn't declare any of the other 3 though, the compiler can generate them.

edit: Note that this information applies to C++03, but it is different in C++11 as Matthieu M. mentions in the comments.

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Note: the rule change a bit for C++11, declaring a move constructor or move assignment operator will automaticaly prevent the automatic creation of a copy constructor and copy assignment operator. It's sensible, but a different spirit. –  Matthieu M. Nov 9 '11 at 16:32
    
@MatthieuM. - thanks for pointing that out. I'm still writing from a C++03 perspective, but I should mention that. –  birryree Nov 9 '11 at 16:43
1  
I'm not sure you got the rule right about when the compiler may generate a constructor. The rule for the default constructor is that any user defined constructor inhibits its automatic generation. The rule for the other three is that a user defined version of that particular operation inhibits its automatic generation. Independently of what the user may have done for the others; if you define a default constructor, or a destructor, you still get an automatic copy constructor. –  James Kanze Nov 9 '11 at 17:03
    
@James - I clarified what I meant - I meant what you said, not what I wrote, which on second reading did imply that the compiler would not generate any of the default functions if any of them were specified. –  birryree Nov 9 '11 at 17:08

Define a constructor taking the correct argument(s). This will prevent the compiler from defining a default constructor.

class X { 
public:
   X(int) {}
};

int main(){ 
    X x; // will not compile;
    X y(1); // will compile.
    return 0;
}
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While the other answers are true, there is a new technique in C++11 for expressing that : http://www2.research.att.com/~bs/C++0xFAQ.html#default

It allows forbidding a function without depending on any other trick. It also clearly express your intention in the code.

class X
{ 
public:
    X(int) {}
    X() = delete; // will never be generated
};

int main()
{ 
    X x; // will not compile;
    X y(1); // will compile.
    return 0;
}
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Create a private default constructor.

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That's still accessible by members and friends of the class. It's better to just define constructors taking arguments, which will remove the implicit default constructor completely. –  Mike Seymour Nov 9 '11 at 16:41

creating a non empty constructor "cancels" the empty default constructor, so if you don't explicitly also create an empty constructor, no objects will be created without giving arguments.

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The reason why you can create an object without passing arguments to the constructor is that you have a default constructor. A default constructor is a kind of constructor which doesn't have a parameter or all parameters having default values. And if you didn't declare any constructor, the compiler will make one for you. So, the solution is very easy. You can declare a constructor with a parameter without default value, then the compiler won't bother to make the constructor to you.

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