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I need to invoke method f. If it raises an IOError, I need to invoke it again (retry), and do it at most three times. I need to log any other exceptions, and I need to log all retries.

the code below does this, but it looks ugly. please help me make it elegant and pythonic. I am using Python 2.7.

thanks!

count = 3
while count > 0:
    try:
        f()
    except IOError:
        count -= 1
        if count > 0:
            print 'retry'
        continue
    except Exception as x:
        print x
    break
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2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Use try .. except .. else:

for i in range(3, 0, -1):
  try:
    f()
  except IOError:
    if i == 1:
      raise
    print('retry')
  else:
    break

You should not generically catch all errors. Just let them bubble up to the appropriate handler.

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1  
You might want to re-raise the IOError on the last try though, so that the program ends with an actual exception (and without a note about a retry that doesn’t happen). –  poke Nov 9 '11 at 17:38
    
thanks. "else" clause is useful, but I need to log all exceptions, so I have to catch the other ones too. yes, I cold raise them again after I have logged them. –  akonsu Nov 9 '11 at 17:44
    
@poke Oops, totally forgot that. Updated. –  phihag Nov 9 '11 at 17:47
    
@akonsu If you want to catch all exceptions, just leave out the IOError or replace it with BaseException. –  phihag Nov 9 '11 at 17:48

You can write a retry decorator:

import time

def retry(times=3, interval=3):
    def wrapper(func):
        def wrapper(*arg, **kwarg):
            for i in range(times):
                try:
                    return func(*arg, **kwarg)
                except:
                    time.sleep(interval)
                    continue
            raise
        return wrapper
    return wrapper


//usage
@retry()
def fun():
    import inspect; print inspect.stack()[0][3]
    return "result"

print fun()
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