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public static Logger getLogger() {
    final Throwable t = new Throwable();
    final StackTraceElement methodCaller = t.getStackTrace()[1];
    final Logger logger = Logger.getLogger(methodCaller.getClassName());
    logger.setLevel(ResourceManager.LOGLEVEL);
    return logger;
}

This method would return a logger that knows the class it's logging for. Any ideas against it?

Many years later: https://github.com/yanchenko/droidparts/blob/master/droidparts/src/org/droidparts/util/L.java

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How is this a question? –  iAn Sep 17 '08 at 7:08
    
edited to encourage discussion :) –  yanchenko Sep 17 '08 at 7:15
    
This code example is great, if you want to log method and line number (and put this code in method log(...) of a class, derived from Logger). Using Throwable is a great idea! Thank you a lot! - Since logging means overhead anyway, I don't care about overhead. BTW: calling Throwable in log(...) method would only mean overhead, when the log record is allowed. –  java.is.for.desktop Mar 13 '10 at 23:02
2  
This code does not work with every Java VM. There exist Java VMs that include in the stacktrace the constructors of the exceptions. This means the first entry is: java.lang.Throwable.<init> –  Horcrux7 Mar 14 '11 at 13:25
2  
@Horcrux7 agree. I've seen JVM's not reporting all lines in stack traces due to optimization. Anyway, you are not guaranteed anything about which lines show up in the stack trace, meaning that your program is now vendor dependent. –  Thorbjørn Ravn Andersen Aug 20 '12 at 16:47

15 Answers 15

up vote 12 down vote accepted

I guess it adds a lot of overhead for every class. Every class has to be 'looked up'. You create new Throwable objects to do that... These throwables don't come for free.

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1  
Isn't logging an overhead anyway? ;) –  java.is.for.desktop Mar 13 '10 at 22:44
    
"A lot of overhead"? This code will be executed once for every class (not object) using this method. I think is negligible. –  sinuhepop Nov 4 '10 at 15:15
    
@sinuhepop you have no way of knowing how many times it will be called. This is only a static method, and without knowing how it's used you can't make that statement. It may be that he'll call it and hold onto it, or he may call it every time he needs to issue a log statement. –  Matt Aug 13 '12 at 16:00
    
@Matt: You're right. But this method is usually declared as an static and final field, as loggers usually are. –  sinuhepop Aug 13 '12 at 22:59

Creating a stack trace is a relatively slow operation. Your caller already knows what class and method it is in, so the effort is wasted. This aspect of your solution is inefficient.

Even if you use static class information, you should not fetch the Logger again for each message. From the author of Log4j,Ceki Gülcü:

The most common error in wrapper classes is the invocation of the Logger.getLogger method on each log request. This is guaranteed to wreak havoc on your application's performance. Really!!!

This is the conventional, efficient idiom for getting a Logger is during class initialization:

private static final Logger log = Logger.getLogger(MyClass.class);

Note that this gives you a separate Logger for each type in a hierarchy. If you come up with a method that invokes getClass() on an instance, you will see messages logged by a base type showing up under the subtype's logger. Maybe this is desirable in some cases, but I find it confusing (and I tend to favor composition over inheritance anyway).

Obviously, using the dynamic type via getClass() will require you to obtain the logger at least once per instance, rather than once per class like the recommended idiom using static type information.

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2  
Standard idiom's are standard for a reason. If you do something different make sure that the additional maintenence hit of having to understand the difference is worth the effort. –  Michael Rutherfurd Nov 20 '08 at 5:25
2  
I think that getLogger method can use a class as parameter at least in java 6. But you can use MyClass.class.getCanonicalName() since java 5. –  PhoneixS Apr 25 '12 at 15:59
    
Didn't work for me. The method getLogger(String) in the type Logger is not applicable for the arguments (Class<DbType>) –  Tim Abell Jun 10 '12 at 0:17

We actually have something quite similar in a LogUtils class. Yes, it's kind of icky, but the advantages are worth it as far as I'm concerned. We wanted to make sure we didn't have any overhead from it being repeatedly called though, so ours (somewhat hackily) ensures that it can ONLY be called from a static initializer context, a la:

private static final Logger LOG = LogUtils.loggerForThisClass();

It will fail if it's invoked from a normal method, or from an instance initializer (i.e. if the 'static' was left off above) to reduce the risk of performance overhead. The method is:

public static Logger loggerForThisClass() {
    // We use the third stack element; second is this method, first is .getStackTrace()
    StackTraceElement myCaller = Thread.currentThread().getStackTrace()[2];
    Assert.equal("<clinit>", myCaller.getMethodName());
    return Logger.getLogger(myCaller.getClassName());
}

Anyone who asks what advantage does this have over

= Logger.getLogger(MyClass.class);

has probably never had to deal with someone who copies and pastes that line from somewhere else and forgets to change the class name, leaving you dealing with a class which sends all its stuff to another logger.

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so ours (somewhat hackily) ensures that it can ONLY be called from a static initializer context: So what happens when someone decides to use your code differently, say: LogUtils.loggerForThisClass().info(....). You can't guarantee it will be used properly. I don't see how your solution does anything but solve the copy and paste issue, while opening up a whole other can of worms. –  Matt Aug 13 '12 at 16:03
2  
Matt: if they use it improperly (like in the case you say) the assertion will fail and throw a RuntimeException. This generally encourages fixing the problem. :) (In reality, AFAIK this never happened while I was at that company; yet copy-and-pasting a logger and logging something with the wrong logger name happened at least a dozen times in my tenure there) –  Cowan Aug 20 '12 at 1:37
    
Do you use "Assert" from the "com.sun.tools.javac.util" package? If yes, can the same then be achieved without using a class from a "com.sun" package? –  Benny Neugebauer Jun 10 at 22:24

Assuming you are keeping static refs to the loggers, here's a standalone static singleton:

public class LoggerUtils extends SecurityManager
{
    public static Logger getLogger()
    {
    	String className = new LoggerUtils().getClassName();
    	Logger logger = Logger.getLogger(className);
    	return logger;
    }

    private String getClassName()
    {
    	return getClassContext()[2].getName();
    }
}

Usage is nice and clean:

Logger logger = LoggerUtils.getLogger();
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1  
Nice trick. I would suggest keeping around the SecurityManager though. When you create an instance of it, it goes and checks a permission each time. Also you would have to instantiate your LoggerUtils inside a doPrivileged() block because of that. –  Trejkaz Oct 14 '09 at 22:07

For every class that you use this with, you're going to have to look up the Logger anyway, so you might as well just use a static Logger in those classes.

private static final Logger logger = Logger.getLogger(MyClass.class.getName());

Then you just reference that logger when you need to do your log messages. Your method does the same thing that the static Log4J Logger does already so why reinvent the wheel?

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You could of course just use Log4J with the appropriate pattern layout:

For example, for the class name "org.apache.xyz.SomeClass", the pattern %C{1} will output "SomeClass".

http://logging.apache.org/log4j/1.2/apidocs/org/apache/log4j/PatternLayout.html

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Don't over look the WARNING the use of %C. It will impact your performance. –  bmatthews68 Sep 17 '08 at 7:35
    
Using the standard idiom will give you the same result from the appender name without the performance impact. It is also subject to the StackTrace format being parsable e.g. AS400 Java had a weird stacktrace, it was human readable but sufficiently different as to be unusable for this purpose. –  Michael Rutherfurd Nov 20 '08 at 5:23

I prefer creating a (static) Logger for each class (with it's explicit class name). I than use the logger as is.

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You don't need to create a new Throwable object. You can just call Thread.currentThread().getStackTrace()[1]

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2  
Look at the source code of Thread. It actually creates an exception if the thread you call getStrackTrace on is the same as the current one. So it's even (very slightly) more expensive. –  Eelco Feb 2 '10 at 5:15

Then the best thing is mix of two .

public class LoggerUtil {

    public static Level level=Level.ALL;

    public static java.util.logging.Logger getLogger() {
        final Throwable t = new Throwable();
        final StackTraceElement methodCaller = t.getStackTrace()[1];
        final java.util.logging.Logger logger = java.util.logging.Logger.getLogger(methodCaller.getClassName());
        logger.setLevel(level);

        return logger;
    }
}

And then in every class:

private static final Logger LOG = LoggerUtil.getLogger();

in code :

LOG.fine("debug that !...");

You get static logger that you can just copy&paste in every class and with no overhead ...

Alaa

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From reading through all the other feedback on this site, I created the following for use with Log4j:

package com.edsdev.testapp.util;

import java.util.concurrent.ConcurrentHashMap;

import org.apache.log4j.Level;
import org.apache.log4j.Priority;

public class Logger extends SecurityManager {

private static ConcurrentHashMap<String, org.apache.log4j.Logger> loggerMap = new ConcurrentHashMap<String, org.apache.log4j.Logger>();

public static org.apache.log4j.Logger getLog() {
    String className = new Logger().getClassName();
    if (!loggerMap.containsKey(className)) {
        loggerMap.put(className, org.apache.log4j.Logger.getLogger(className));
    }
    return loggerMap.get(className);
}
public String getClassName() {
    return getClassContext()[3].getName();
}
public static void trace(Object message) {
    getLog().trace(message);
}
public static void trace(Object message, Throwable t) {
    getLog().trace(message, t);
}
public static boolean isTraceEnabled() {
    return getLog().isTraceEnabled();
}
public static void debug(Object message) {
    getLog().debug(message);
}
public static void debug(Object message, Throwable t) {
    getLog().debug(message, t);
}
public static void error(Object message) {
    getLog().error(message);
}
public static void error(Object message, Throwable t) {
    getLog().error(message, t);
}
public static void fatal(Object message) {
    getLog().fatal(message);
}
public static void fatal(Object message, Throwable t) {
    getLog().fatal(message, t);
}
public static void info(Object message) {
    getLog().info(message);
}
public static void info(Object message, Throwable t) {
    getLog().info(message, t);
}
public static boolean isDebugEnabled() {
    return getLog().isDebugEnabled();
}
public static boolean isEnabledFor(Priority level) {
    return getLog().isEnabledFor(level);
}
public static boolean isInfoEnabled() {
    return getLog().isInfoEnabled();
}
public static void setLevel(Level level) {
    getLog().setLevel(level);
}
public static void warn(Object message) {
    getLog().warn(message);
}
public static void warn(Object message, Throwable t) {
    getLog().warn(message, t);
}

}

Now in your code all you need is

Logger.debug("This is a test");

or

Logger.error("Look what happened Ma!", e);

If you need more exposure to log4j methods, just delegate them from the Logger class listed above.

share|improve this answer

Why not?

public static Logger getLogger(Object o) {
  final Logger logger = Logger.getLogger(o.getClass());
  logger.setLevel(ResourceManager.LOGLEVEL);
  return logger;
}

And then when you need a logger for a class:

getLogger(this).debug("Some log message")
share|improve this answer
    
Because it is readable and predictable rather than magic of course! ;-) –  Eelco Feb 2 '10 at 5:17

This mechanism puts in a lot of extra effort at runtime.

If you use Eclipse as your IDE, consider using Log4e. This handy plugin will generate logger declarations for you using your favourite logging framework. A fraction more effort at coding time, but much less work at runtime.

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Unless you really need your Logger to be static, you could use

final Logger logger = LoggerFactory.getLogger(getClass());
share|improve this answer

Please see my static getLogger() implementation (use same "sun.*" magic on JDK 7 as default java Logger doit)

  • note static logging methods (with static import) without ugly log property...

    import static my.pakg.Logger.*;

And their speed is equivalent to native Java implementation (checked with 1 million of log traces)

package my.pkg;

import java.text.MessageFormat;
import java.util.Arrays;
import java.util.IllegalFormatException;
import java.util.logging.Level;
import java.util.logging.LogRecord;

import sun.misc.JavaLangAccess;
import sun.misc.SharedSecrets;


public class Logger {
static final int CLASS_NAME = 0;
static final int METHOD_NAME = 1;

// Private method to infer the caller's class and method names
protected static String[] getClassName() {
    JavaLangAccess access = SharedSecrets.getJavaLangAccess();
    Throwable throwable = new Throwable();
    int depth = access.getStackTraceDepth(throwable);

    boolean lookingForLogger = true;
    for (int i = 0; i < depth; i++) {
        // Calling getStackTraceElement directly prevents the VM
        // from paying the cost of building the entire stack frame.
        StackTraceElement frame = access.getStackTraceElement(throwable, i);
        String cname = frame.getClassName();
        boolean isLoggerImpl = isLoggerImplFrame(cname);
        if (lookingForLogger) {
            // Skip all frames until we have found the first logger frame.
            if (isLoggerImpl) {
                lookingForLogger = false;
            }
        } else {
            if (!isLoggerImpl) {
                // skip reflection call
                if (!cname.startsWith("java.lang.reflect.") && !cname.startsWith("sun.reflect.")) {
                    // We've found the relevant frame.
                    return new String[] {cname, frame.getMethodName()};
                }
            }
        }
    }
    return new String[] {};
    // We haven't found a suitable frame, so just punt.  This is
    // OK as we are only committed to making a "best effort" here.
}

protected static String[] getClassNameJDK5() {
    // Get the stack trace.
    StackTraceElement stack[] = (new Throwable()).getStackTrace();
    // First, search back to a method in the Logger class.
    int ix = 0;
    while (ix < stack.length) {
        StackTraceElement frame = stack[ix];
        String cname = frame.getClassName();
        if (isLoggerImplFrame(cname)) {
            break;
        }
        ix++;
    }
    // Now search for the first frame before the "Logger" class.
    while (ix < stack.length) {
        StackTraceElement frame = stack[ix];
        String cname = frame.getClassName();
        if (isLoggerImplFrame(cname)) {
            // We've found the relevant frame.
            return new String[] {cname, frame.getMethodName()};
        }
        ix++;
    }
    return new String[] {};
    // We haven't found a suitable frame, so just punt.  This is
    // OK as we are only committed to making a "best effort" here.
}


private static boolean isLoggerImplFrame(String cname) {
    // the log record could be created for a platform logger
    return (
            cname.equals("my.package.Logger") ||
            cname.equals("java.util.logging.Logger") ||
            cname.startsWith("java.util.logging.LoggingProxyImpl") ||
            cname.startsWith("sun.util.logging."));
}

protected static java.util.logging.Logger getLogger(String name) {
    return java.util.logging.Logger.getLogger(name);
}

protected static boolean log(Level level, String msg, Object... args) {
    return log(level, null, msg, args);
}

protected static boolean log(Level level, Throwable thrown, String msg, Object... args) {
    String[] values = getClassName();
    java.util.logging.Logger log = getLogger(values[CLASS_NAME]);
    if (level != null && log.isLoggable(level)) {
        if (msg != null) {
            log.log(getRecord(level, thrown, values[CLASS_NAME], values[METHOD_NAME], msg, args));
        }
        return true;
    }
    return false;
}

protected static LogRecord getRecord(Level level, Throwable thrown, String className, String methodName, String msg, Object... args) {
    LogRecord record = new LogRecord(level, format(msg, args));
    record.setSourceClassName(className);
    record.setSourceMethodName(methodName);
    if (thrown != null) {
        record.setThrown(thrown);
    }
    return record;
}

private static String format(String msg, Object... args) {
    if (msg == null || args == null || args.length == 0) {
        return msg;
    } else if (msg.indexOf('%') >= 0) {
        try {
            return String.format(msg, args);
        } catch (IllegalFormatException esc) {
            // none
        }
    } else if (msg.indexOf('{') >= 0) {
        try {
            return MessageFormat.format(msg, args);
        } catch (IllegalArgumentException exc) {
            // none
        }
    }
    if (args.length == 1) {
        Object param = args[0];
        if (param != null && param.getClass().isArray()) {
            return msg + Arrays.toString((Object[]) param);
        } else if (param instanceof Throwable){
            return msg;
        } else {
            return msg + param;
        }
    } else {
        return msg + Arrays.toString(args);
    }
}

public static void severe(String msg, Object... args) {
    log(Level.SEVERE, msg, args);
}

public static void warning(String msg, Object... args) {
    log(Level.WARNING, msg, args);
}

public static void info(Throwable thrown, String format, Object... args) {
    log(Level.INFO, thrown, format, args);
}

public static void warning(Throwable thrown, String format, Object... args) {
    log(Level.WARNING, thrown, format, args);
}

public static void warning(Throwable thrown) {
    log(Level.WARNING, thrown, thrown.getMessage());
}

public static void severe(Throwable thrown, String format, Object... args) {
    log(Level.SEVERE, thrown, format, args);
}

public static void severe(Throwable thrown) {
    log(Level.SEVERE, thrown, thrown.getMessage());
}

public static void info(String msg, Object... args) {
    log(Level.INFO, msg, args);
}

public static void fine(String msg, Object... args) {
    log(Level.FINE, msg, args);
}

public static void finer(String msg, Object... args) {
    log(Level.FINER, msg, args);
}

public static void finest(String msg, Object... args) {
    log(Level.FINEST, msg, args);
}

public static boolean isLoggableFinest() {
    return isLoggable(Level.FINEST);
}

public static boolean isLoggableFiner() {
    return isLoggable(Level.FINER);
}

public static boolean isLoggableFine() {
    return isLoggable(Level.FINE);
}

public static boolean isLoggableInfo() {
    return isLoggable(Level.INFO);
}

public static boolean isLoggableWarning() {
    return isLoggable(Level.WARNING);
}
public static boolean isLoggableSevere() {
    return isLoggable(Level.SEVERE);
}

private static boolean isLoggable(Level level) {
    return log(level, null);
}

}
share|improve this answer

Take a look at Logger class from jcabi-log. It does exactly what you're looking for, providing a collection of static methods. You don't need to embed loggers into classes any more:

import com.jcabi.log.Logger;
class Foo {
  public void bar() {
    Logger.info(this, "doing something...");
  }
}

Logger sends all logs to SLF4J, which you can redirect to any other logging facility, in runtime.

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