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Say I have the following checkbox:

<input type="checkbox" value="1-25" />

To get the two numbers that define the boundaries of range I'm looking for, I use the following jQuery:

var value = $(this).val();
var lowEnd = Number(value.split('-')[0]);
var highEnd = Number(value.split('-')[1]);

How do I then create an array that contains all integers between lowEnd and highEnd, including lowEnd and highEnd themselves? For this specific example, obviously, the resulting array would be:

[1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25]
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2  
What have you tried so far? –  Igor Nov 9 '11 at 17:54
    
Nothing of note. Creating the array is part of a larger issue I've been trying to work through, which I had been approaching from a completely different direction. I realized this might be a more effective approach, despite the fact arrays are one element of JS I've always had trouble fully grasping. Unfortunately, I couldn't find anything on Stack Overflow or elsewhere that specifically dealt with this question. –  40 Degree Day Nov 9 '11 at 18:08

10 Answers 10

up vote 36 down vote accepted
var list = [];
for (var i = lowEnd; i <= highEnd; i++) {
    list.push(i);
}
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4  
And just for general information, in CoffeeScript it would look like "1..25" which actually transforms to something like this in JavaScript. So there is no easier way to do this. –  FreeCandies Nov 9 '11 at 18:02
    
This is perfect -- thank you! –  40 Degree Day Nov 9 '11 at 18:23
1  
@FreeCandies - True, CoffeeScript has this convenience, but you'd still have to run it through the compiler - slow or inconvenient, and you'd remain clueless as to how to do it by hand. I sincerely hope we're not going to replace the 'just use jQuery' era with 'just use CoffeeScript' –  meouw Nov 9 '11 at 20:23
    
Note, the correct coffeescript notation is [1..25] –  Alain Jacomet Forte Aug 22 '13 at 16:51

My version of the loop ;)

var lowEnd = 1;
var highEnd = 25;
var arr = [];
while(lowEnd <= highEnd){
   arr.push(lowEnd++);
}
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2  
This method vastly outperformed the chosen answer just FYI. –  Brian Nov 17 '12 at 4:58
    
That would be sveral times faster if one used var arr = new Array(highEnd - lowEnd + 1). –  polkovnikov.ph Nov 19 '14 at 2:10

I highly recommend underscore or lo-dash libraries

http://underscorejs.org/#range

(apparently almost completely compatible, lodash runs quicker, apparently, but underscore has better doco (IMHO)

_.range([start], stop, [step])

Not just for this but a bunch of very useful utilities

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var values = $(this).val().split('-'),
    i = +values[0],
    l = +values[1],
    range = [];

while (i < l) {
    range[range.length] = i;
    i += 1;
}

range[range.length] = l;

There's probably a DRYer way to do the loop, but that's the basic idea.

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You can design a range method that increments a 'from' number by a desired amount until it reaches a 'to' number. This example will 'count' up or down, depending on whether from is larger or smaller than to.

Array.range= function(from, to, step){
    if(typeof from== 'number'){
        var A= [from];
        step= typeof step== 'number'? Math.abs(step):1;
        if(from> to){
            while((from -= step)>= to) A.push(from);
        }
        else{
            while((from += step)<= to) A.push(from);
        }
        return A;
    }   
}

If you ever want to step by a decimal amount : Array.range(0,1,.01) you will need to truncate the values of any floating point imprecision. Otherwise you will return numbers like 0.060000000000000005 instead of .06.

This adds a little overhead to the other version, but works correctly for integer or decimal steps.

Array.range= function(from, to, step, prec){
    if(typeof from== 'number'){
        var A= [from];
        step= typeof step== 'number'? Math.abs(step):1;
        if(!prec){
            prec= (from+step)%1? String((from+step)%1).length+1:0;
        }
        if(from> to){
            while(+(from -= step).toFixed(prec)>= to) A.push(+from.toFixed(prec));
        }
        else{
            while(+(from += step).toFixed(prec)<= to) A.push(+from.toFixed(prec));
        }
        return A;
    }   
}
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fastest way

  1. while-- is faster on most browsers
  2. direct setting a variable is faster than push

function:

var x=function(a,b,c,d){d=[];c=b-a+1;while(c--){d[c]=b--}return d},

theArray=x(lowEnd,highEnd);

or

var arr=[],c=highEnd-lowEnd+1;
while(c--){arr[c]=highEnd--}

EDIT

readable version

var arr = [],
c = highEnd - lowEnd + 1;
while ( c-- ) {
 arr[c] = highEnd--
}

Demo

http://jsfiddle.net/W3CUn/

FOR THE DOWNVOTERS

performance

http://jsperf.com/for-push-while-set/2

faster in ie and 3x faster in firefox

only on aipad air the for loop is a little faster.

tested on win8, osx10.8, ubuntu14.04, ipad, ipad air, ipod;

with chrome,ff,ie,safari,mobile safari.

i would like to see the performance on older ie browsers where the for loop isn't that optimized!

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1  
These are great ideas... but I would try and make your code more easily readable for others with proper indenting, word spacing, and line returns.. –  Blaine Kasten Sep 24 '13 at 16:33
    
As this are very short functions with not manyparameters i intendendly wrote it this way so you just can copy and past.in the first case just replace x with whatever function name you want.there is also noo need to change the functions abcd as they are only that functions private parameters. –  cocco Sep 24 '13 at 17:09
    
And c & d are put inside the functions parameters as placeholder to leave out the 'var' –  cocco Sep 24 '13 at 17:15
function createNumberArray(lowEnd, highEnd) {
    var start = lowEnd;
    var array = [start];
    while (start < highEnd) {
        array.push(start);
        start++;
    }
} 
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2  
var array = {start}; gives you a standard object which doesn't have the push method. you mean var array = []; surely –  meouw Nov 9 '11 at 18:02
    
+1 thanks for catching that –  Igor Nov 9 '11 at 18:03

If the start is always less than the end, we can do:

function range(start, end) {
  var myArray = [];
  for (var i = start; i <= end; i += 1) {
    myArray.push(i);
  }
  return myArray;
};
console.log(range(4, 12));                 // → [4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12]

If we want to be able to take a third argument to be able to modify the step used to build the array, and to make it work even though the start is greater than the end:

function otherRange(start, end, step) {
  otherArray = [];
  if (step == undefined) {
    step = 1;
  };
  if (step > 0) {
    for (var i = start; i <= end; i += step) {
      otherArray.push(i);
    }
  } else {
    for (var i = start; i >= end; i += step) {
      otherArray.push(i);
    }
  };
  return otherArray;
};
console.log(otherRange(10, 0, -2));        // → [10, 8, 6, 4, 2, 0]
console.log(otherRange(10, 15));           // → [10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15]
console.log(otherRange(10, 20, 2));        // → [10, 12, 14, 16, 18, 20]

This way the function accepts positive and negative steps and if no step is given, it defaults to 1.

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Solving in underscore

data = [];
_.times( highEnd, function( n ){ data.push( lowEnd ++ ) } );
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Use Case

var genArr=(1)['..'](10)  //[1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10]

API ;

Number.prototype['..']=function(to,step){
     var arr = [],from=this;
     while(from <= to){
        arr.push(from++);
     }
     return arr;
};

FIDDLE :

http://jsfiddle.net/abdennour/mcpnvsmm/

share|improve this answer
    
..then , ... : (1)['..'](10).forEach(function(e){console.log(e)}) . . for example –  Abdennour TOUMI Jan 31 at 2:00

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