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I have a Spring-based system that uses Hibernate Search 3.4 (on top of Hibernate 3.5.4). Integration tests are managed by Spring, with @Transactional annotation. At the moment test data (entities that are to be indexed) is loaded by Liquibase script, we use it's Spring integration. It's very inconvenient to manage.

My new solution is to have test data defined as Spring beans and wire them as Resources, by name. This part works.

I tried to have these beans persisted and indexed in setUp method of my test cases (and in test methods themselves) but I failed. They get into DB fine but I can't get them indexed. I tried calling index() on FullTextEntityManager (with flushToIndexes), I tried createIndexer().startAndWait().

What else can I do? Or may be there is some better option of testing HS?

Thank You in advance

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1 Answer 1

My new solution is to have test data defined as Spring beans and wire them as Resources, by name. This part works.

sounds like a strange setup for a unit test. To be honest I am not quote sure how you do this.

In Search itself an in memory database (H2) is used together with a Lucene RAM directory. The benefits of such a setup is that it is fast and easy to avoid dependencies between tests.

I tried to have these beans persisted and indexed in setUp method of my test cases (and in test methods themselves) but I failed. They get into DB fine but I can't get them indexed.

If automatic indexing is enabled and the persisting of the test data is occurring within an transaction, it should work. A common mistake in combination with Spring is to use the wrong transaction manager. The Hibernate Search forum has a lot of threads around this, for example this one - https://forum.hibernate.org/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=998155. Since you are not giving any concrete configuration and code examples it is hard to give more specific advice.

I tried createIndexer().startAndWait()

that is also a good approach. I would recommend this approach if you want to insert not such a couple of test entities, but a whole set of data. In this case it can make sense to use a framework like dbunit to insert the testdata and then manually index the data. createIndexer().startAndWait() is the right tool for that. Extracting all this loading/persisting/indexing functionality into a common test base class is the way to go. The base class can also be responsible to do all the Spring bootstrapping.

Again, to give more specific feedback you have to refine your question.

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Thank for Your answer. –  user1037936 Dec 16 '11 at 13:53

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