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char* buf;
buf = malloc(BUFSIZ);
memset(buf ,0 , BUFSIZ);

I think that memset initializes the buf variable with size of BUFSIZ, but malloc also allocates a block of size BUFSIZE of memory and returning a pointer to the beginning of the block to the variable buf... I do not know if memset can be used for pointers because it initialize data with size BUFSIZE but we do not poit to it.... Can you suggests anything to fix this problem, thanks


Hi all and thanks for the answers. So I understood that the problem generally comes from the fact that malloc can fail and then the buf will point to NULL. And maybe the best way to fix the flaw of the code is to check if buf is equals to null?

char* buf;
buf = malloc(BUFSIZ);
if(buf!=null)
{
memset(buf ,0 , BUFSIZ);
}

Maybe the best way to fix the flaw of the code is to check if buf is equals to null?

char* buf;
buf = malloc(BUFSIZ);
if(buf!=null)
{
memset(buf ,0 , BUFSIZ);
}

Is it possible in practice malloc to fail? Or it is just a theory?

share|improve this question
10  
There's nothing wrong with this code. What problem are you trying to solve and what makes you think there's a problem? – Graeme Perrow Nov 9 '11 at 19:36
    
The code fails to check the return state of malloc. You can get away with that on linux (because of over-commit and the OOM killer) and on other platforms with protected memory (provided that segfault-and-die is an acceptable response) but is is a bad practice in general. – dmckee Nov 12 '11 at 21:48

There's just no problem with that code, except the fact that you don't check for NULL after allocating memory.

Note that you can also use calloc to allocate memory, initialized with 0, so you can avoid the memset call:

char * buf;

buf = calloc( 1, BUFSIZ );

if( buf == NULL )
{
    /* Error management */
}
share|improve this answer
4  
+1 for recommending calloc. But don't pollute a beautiful language with that hideous cast. =) – Stephen Canon Nov 9 '11 at 19:40
1  
+1 for not using sizeof(char) as the first argument. -1 for the cast. The cast is superfluous, dangerous, and TOTALLY WRONG. c != c++. @Macmade: please explain why it "would be needed". – wildplasser Nov 9 '11 at 19:43
1  
The cast is never needed. You seem to be confusing C with some other language that looks sort of vaguely like C. =) – Stephen Canon Nov 9 '11 at 19:45
5  
The cast does not "suck CPU cycles", except for a few hundred while parsing. For the human reader, it costs a fraction of a second to read and understand it (and a few minutes of anger). Loss of value for the dishes and furniture varies per case. – wildplasser Nov 9 '11 at 19:50
1  
It is dangerous because it hides errors detected by the compiler. The obvious error to be hidden is failure to include <stdlib.h>, which would cause the prototype for malloc() et.al. to be defaulted to "int". This certainly fails terribly when sizeof (int) != sizeof (void*), such as on most 64 bit platforms. Including stdlib and trusting on a (void*) to be cast to any pointer type will solve any problem. Not including stdlib will cause (at least) an error message/diagnostic. – wildplasser Nov 13 '11 at 0:07

Provided that malloc does not fail and return a NULL pointer, this is fine.

buf points to the start of the allocated memory, which is BUFSIZ bytes big. memset sets BUFSIZ bytes to 0 starting at the memory pointed to by buf.

share|improve this answer
    
So in the end buf will point to a block of memory with size BUFSIZ which block will have only 0-s in it? – Lyubomir Velchev Nov 9 '11 at 19:51
1  
Yes, that's right. – nos Nov 9 '11 at 20:21

memset is the equivalent of:

void *memset(void *s, int c, size_t n) {
    char *ss = (char *)s;
    while (n--)
        *ss++ = c;
    return s;
}

So, yes, it can be (and is) used in pointers. It sets s, and (n-1) bytes following s, to c.

share|improve this answer
char* buf; // u declare a pointer, pointing to some random memory area
buf = malloc(BUFSIZ); // you allocate BUFSIZ bytes on the heap and set buf to point to that area.
memset( buf, 0, BUFSIZE ); // the area where buf points to are all set to 0, all BUFSIZE of them.

seems pretty straightforward.

memset is a bit like:

for (unsigned char *p = buf; p < buf + BUFSIZE; *p++ = '\0' );
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