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Now that there are lambdas in C++, it seems really silly that I cannot declare a local function...

e.g.:

I can declare a type in a function body, even initialize it as a table of values. But I cannot create a helper function that works with that data type - because I cannot declare a function in a function, and I cannot refer to that data type outside of the function because it's only available in that scope.

There are times when it's quite simple to pull the data type out of the function, and define my data type and helper functions there (local file scope) - but there are times when it's not really a plausible solution - e.g. when initializing the table with inline lambdas that refer to local scope variables (or this).

Any idea whether support for local functions is coming, is already defined, or why that they're difficult for compiler-writers to implement and hence aren't a part of the standard?

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10  
What would a local function give you that couldn't just as easily be accomplished with auto + a lambda? –  ildjarn Nov 9 '11 at 20:01
    
Local functions are way harder to implement than local variables, though it is possible the same way lambdas are implemented. –  slartibartfast Nov 9 '11 at 20:02
    
Maybe nothing in full C++11? Although not sure what adv. declaring a lambda has over a named local either... seems like if the compiler can handle one, it can handle the other, no? And I would think that the rules should be similar - except that you can't capture anything with a local function, so yeah, simpler... –  Mordachai Nov 9 '11 at 20:08
    
Personally I am against local types. They needlessly complicates parsing and are rarely use, and (at least in C++03) they cannot be used as template arguments... I much prefer anonymous namespaces. –  Matthieu M. Nov 9 '11 at 20:13
1  
"Although not sure what adv. declaring a lambda has over a named local either..." Well the main advantage is that it's legal/supported whereas a named local function is not. ;-] –  ildjarn Nov 9 '11 at 20:26

4 Answers 4

up vote 13 down vote accepted

There are no local functions, but they are not so useful without the closure, that is, access to the local variables. In any case you can emulate a local function with a lambda easy enough.

Instead of:

void foo(int x)
{
    struct S
    {
         //...
    };
    int Twice(int n, S *s) //Not allowed
    {
        return 2*n;
    }

    S s;
    int x = Twice(3, &s);
    //...
}

Do:

void foo()
{
    struct S
    {
         //...
    };
    auto Twice = [](int x, S *s) -> int //Cool!
    {
        return 2*x;
    }; //Twice is actually a variable, so don't forget the ;


    S s;
    int x = Twice(3, &s);
    //...
}

If the capture set is empty, ([]) it can even be converted to an ordinary pointer-to-function, just like a real one!

And AFAIK, lambdas can use local types without trouble. But, of course, public static member functions in that struct should work also fine.

And as an additional note, indirectly related to your question, what it is allowed in C++11 is to instantiate a template using a local type (that was forbidden in C++98):

void foo()
{
    struct S {};
    std::vector<S> vs; //error in C++98, ok in C++11
}
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2  
-> int is redundant. –  GManNickG Nov 10 '11 at 21:58

There are no local functions in C++11.

But there are lambdas.

And your local type can have member functions!

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No, you can't do this but surely lambdas are more useful than pure local functions since they can also optionally capture state? They can either be used anonymously or assigned to an auto variable and used in as many places as you like.

Previously the other main workaround (especially when using the standard library algorithms) was to define a local functor struct with a suitable operator() implementation. You can also capture state using this method but requires more code to do so. Lambdas are a very neat and concise way of achieving the same thing.

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Local functions are definitely not hard to implement, they were present at least in 1968 in Pascal, maybe even earlier. They are implemented as a C extension in GCC.

Passing the address of a nested function is a bit more involved, it generally includes setting up a piece of code (trampoline), which first setups the static link/display/whatever mechanism is used to access local variables and then executes the actual function code. The trampoline resides on stack, which means the stack must be executable, with the usual security implications from this.

Whether the C++ committee has considered and rejected nested functions is anyone's guess, but I would suggest that, while not that hard to implement, the benefits of nested functions are not really worth the effort.

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