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Still learning the MySQL ropes and I'm trying to find out how to do a specific selection involving many-to-many. I apologize if the table names are too generic, I was just doing some self-made exercises. I try my best to be a self-learner.

I have 3 tables one of which is a linking table. How do I write the statement which says "Show which users own both an HTC and a Samsung phone" (they own 2 phones). I'm guessing the answer is in the WHERE statement but I can't figure out how to word it.

-- Table: mark3
+---------+-----------+
| phoneid | name      |
+---------+-----------+
|       1 | HTC       |
|       2 | Nokia     |
|       3 | Samsung   |
|       4 | Motorolla |
+---------+-----------+

-- Table: mark4
+------+---------+
| uid  | phoneid |
+------+---------+
|    1 |       1 |
|    1 |       2 |
|    2 |       1 |
|    2 |       3 |
|    2 |       4 |
|    3 |       1 |
|    3 |       3 |
+------+---------+

-- Table: mark5
+------+-------+
| uid  | name  |
+------+-------+
|    1 | John  |
|    2 | Paul  |
|    3 | Peter |
+------+-------+
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2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

The key is in the GROUP BY/HAVING using a COUNT of DISTINCT phone names. When the count is 2, you'll know the user has both phones.

SELECT m5.name
    FROM mark5 m5
        INNER JOIN mark4 m4
            ON m5.uid = m4.uid
        INNER JOIN mark3 m3
            ON m4.phoneid = m3.phoneid
    WHERE m3.name in ('HTC', 'Samsung')
    GROUP BY m5.name
    HAVING COUNT(DISTINCT m3.name) = 2;
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot Joe! –  enchance Nov 9 '11 at 20:16
    
@enchance: Nothing says "thanks" like an accepted answer. :-) –  Joe Stefanelli Nov 9 '11 at 22:34
    
You got it, man. Also, instead of calling the table mark5 you made it into m5, I didn't know you can do that just by writing it after the table name. Is that the equivalent of AS which is for column names? –  enchance Nov 9 '11 at 22:51
    
@enchance: It is equivalent. The AS keyword is optional. You could write ...FROM mark5 AS m5... –  Joe Stefanelli Nov 9 '11 at 22:56

The answer I think you are looking for is:

"SELECT DISTINCT mark5.name FROM mark5 JOIN mark4 ON (mark4.uid = mark5.uid) JOIN mark3 ON (mark3.phoneid = mark4.phoneid) WHERE mark3.name = 'HTC' && mark3.name = 'Samsung'"

I believe that will answer your questions where you are pulling the Distinct Names from mark5 and joining your other tables on those specific values where phone name is HTC or Samsung

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2  
I'm pretty sure you can't use && in place of AND, but I could be wrong. Regardless, that will never return any rows because a phone name can't be both HTC and Samsung at the same time. –  Tim Gautier Nov 9 '11 at 20:25
    
Doesn't return anything. Joe's answer is much better. –  enchance Nov 9 '11 at 22:50

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