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I have one table and I want to select 10 rows randomly. But I also need to select any rows that are on "sale". I only want only 10 rows, there may be 2 sale rows there may be 9, I need to fill the remaining with random rows. I need a single query.

SELECT TOP 10 BookTitle, BookAuthor, BookCategory
FROM TheTable
ORDER BY newid()

SELECT TOP 10 BookTitle, BookAuthor, BookCategory
FROM TheTable
WHERE BookCategory LIKE 'Sale%' 

I keep striking out, I may be over / under thinking this ....

Thanks.

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What if there are 11 on sale? Then you want a random 10 of them? –  Mark Byers Nov 9 '11 at 20:37

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Not very efficient for a large table but...

SELECT TOP 10 BookTitle,
              BookAuthor,
              BookCategory
FROM   TheTable
ORDER  BY CASE
            WHEN BookCategory LIKE 'Sale%' THEN 0
            ELSE 1
          END,
          newid()  

If your table is large you should probably do 2 queries. One to get sale items and then the second to get the "top up" number of random non sale items only if required.

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Heh... I type too slow. +1 :) –  Tom H. Nov 9 '11 at 20:51
    
That CASE is a clever language trick, but the result is quite bad: full table scan, build sort table, sort, then get top 10. Do this for every query over 1M rows, watch the lights dim in the datacenter ;) –  Remus Rusanu Nov 9 '11 at 22:01
    
@RemusRusanu - Yep, agree it is not suitable for large tables (but then again table sample isn't really suited for small ones either) would be useful to know the number of rows involved. –  Martin Smith Nov 9 '11 at 22:18

Select 10 by category and 10 random in a subquery.
Prioritize the ones by category.

SELECT TOP 10 BookTitle, BookAuthor, BookCategory
FROM (
    SELECT TOP 10 BookTitle, BookAuthor, BookCategory, 0 as prio
    FROM TheTable
    WHERE BookCategory LIKE 'Sale%')

    UNION ALL 
    SELECT TOP 10 BookTitle, BookAuthor, BookCategory, 1 As prio
    FROM TheTable
    TABLESAMPLE (50 ROWS)
    ) x
ORDER BY prio

I took the TABLESAMPLE from @Remus's answer, because this is obviously much faster with big tables. Vote for him if that's the major feature for you.

However, I adjusted it TABLESAMPLE (50 ROWS), because of this warning in the manual:

The actual number of rows that are returned can vary significantly. If you specify a small number, such as 5, you might not receive results in the sample.

I just tested and reproduced this. I left the TOP 10 additionally because we only need a maximum of 10 in the end.

Also, the manual adds a disclamer on the "randomness":

If you really want a random sample of individual rows, modify your query to filter out rows randomly, instead of using TABLESAMPLE.

So, if truly random picks are a requirement, your original newid() is the right approach.

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Use TABLESAMPLE. Using the naive approach of ORDER BY NEWID() will result in horrible performance as the entire table will have to be scanned and ordered for each query, just to select 10 random rows. The built-in TABLESAMPLE syntax will give the desired number of rows using a highly efficient IO page sampling, and the sample randomness is more than enough for everyday use. See Limiting Result Sets by Using TABLESAMPLE for more details.

select top(10) BookTitle, BookAuthor, BookCategory 
from (
   SELECT TOP(10) BookTitle, BookAuthor, BookCategory
   FROM TheTable
   WHERE BookCategory LIKE 'Sale%'
   UNION ALL 
   SELECT BookTitle, BookAuthor, BookCategory
   FROM TheTable TABLESAMPLE (10 ROWS)) as theUnion;

Note that this does not guarantee that any the 'random' row is not one of the 'Sale%' rows, producing in effect duplicates. IF you require such an exclusion, it is possible but more complicated and potentially inefficient.

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+1 for TABLESAMPLE. I shamelessly copied that from you, but in modified form. You may be interested. Also, your answer fails to prioritize the non-random rows, so the result is not guaranteed to be right. –  Erwin Brandstetter Nov 9 '11 at 22:23

Is there something wrong with combining both queries?

SELECT TOP 10 BookTitle, BookAuthor, BookCategory
FROM TheTable
ORDER BY newid()
WHERE BookCategory LIKE 'Sale%'
share|improve this answer
1  
Yes, there is something wrong: if only 5 items are on 'sale', then it does not return 10 rows. –  Remus Rusanu Nov 9 '11 at 21:59
    
So, if you only have 2 rows, you still want 10 rows randomly selected from those 2 rows? And you don't care that it will be filled with duplicates? –  user978122 Nov 10 '11 at 6:22

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