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How can I find the source for some CSS styles being applied to my page in IE8? Specifically, my <legend> is orange and has a size of about 1px unless I set a style on it (even on the <fieldset> doesn't work)

EDIT :
Here is an example to show what I mean. The markup is:

<html>
<head>
</head>
<body>
    <form>
        <fieldset>
            <legend>test1</legend>
        </fieldset>
    </form>
</body>
</html>

And the result in my IE8 is

enter image description here

If you look closely you can see the tiny orange spec that is the legend.

EDIT 2:
I just noticed that the fieldset has round corners. Is this odd, or am I wrong and this is how fieldsets look in IE?

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2 Answers 2

Hit f12 and you will get the developer tools. Click the arrow button and then click on the element in question. You will get a list of all styles applied to the element and where they are coming from.

The tricky part about background though is that you could have a transparent background on your element and one of its ancestors may have the background color. So you may need to traverse the tree.

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It is not background, it is foreground. Where in this do I get the styles? All I can find is the styles applied by my style sheets, not the ones applied by the browser. –  baruch Nov 9 '11 at 21:43

You can use the DOM inspector of Firebug Lite.

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How can you use this to find the origin of a css rule? –  baruch Nov 9 '11 at 21:43
    
@baruch yep. See this image. –  Galled Nov 9 '11 at 21:50
    
That doesn't give the browser's default rules. –  baruch Nov 9 '11 at 21:53
2  
@baruch I think no. But to avoid problems with the styles applied by the browser, why not use a css reset? –  Galled Nov 9 '11 at 21:57

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