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I need to parse a file that has the following formatted data and get the DIRNAME for the OTHER node.

    CLASS=
     (SOURCE=
        (TYPE=FILE)
        (DEFAULT=
           (DIRNAME=${HOME}/information/logs)
        )
      )


    OTHER=
     (SOURCE=
        (TYPE=FILE)
        (DEFAULT=
           (DIRNAME=${HOME}/site/location)
        )
      )

    STUDENT=
     (SOURCE=
        (TYPE=FILE)
        (DEFAULT=
           (DIRNAME=/opt/students)
        )
      )

I have to capture everything that is contained in the OTHER= field, like so:

    OTHER= <whitespace> ( <to capture> ) 

and then I have to capture everything that is within the DIRNAME in the OTHER= field, like so:

    (DIRNAME=<to capture>)

I would like to do this in a sort of robust script that can run in most unix systems, anyone know what command line tools I should use for this and what sort of regular expressions would I need to capture the data in the way I have outlined.

Any help appreciated,

Ted

share|improve this question
    
weehoo. Lisp meets Oracle tnsnames. Best of breed :) –  sehe Nov 10 '11 at 11:15

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

see the test below:

kent$  cat t
    CLASS=
     (SOURCE=
        (TYPE=FILE)
        (DEFAULT=
           (DIRNAME=${HOME}/information/logs)
        )
      )


    OTHER=
     (SOURCE=
        (TYPE=FILE)
        (DEFAULT=
           (DIRNAME=${HOME}/site/location)
        )
      )

    STUDENT=
     (SOURCE=
        (TYPE=FILE)
        (DEFAULT=
           (DIRNAME=/opt/students)
        )
      )

kent$  awk -F= '$1~/OTHER/{i++;print $2} $1~/DIRNAME/ && i{i=0;gsub(/\)$/,"",$2); print $2}' t

${HOME}/site/location

note that there was an empty line above output line ${HOME}/site/location, it was the whitespace after OTHER=

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This might work for you:

sed -ne '/OTHER/,/DIRNAME/{s/^[^D]*DIRNAME=\(.*\))/\1/p}' input_file
${HOME}/site/location
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Your data looks like it would be easy to translate to XML. From there, you can easily use standard XML tools like XSLT to specify exactly what you want to extract.

For this small sample, the XML approach is probably overkill, and if you need to cope with, say, escaped parentheses, or stuff which needs to be escaped in order to be well-formed XML, maybe it's not worth the effort. But if you want robust and portable, I'd say this is the way to go.

For what it's worth, your data looks like S-expressions; maybe there is something like xsltproc for S-expressions already?

Here's a brief Perl two-liner which seems to work for transforming your test data to some sort of pseudo-XML. I have not attempted to handle the root nodes; ask again if you need more help.

$ perl -pe 's{\(([^\s=]+)=|\)}{ if (defined $1) { push @tags, $1; "<$1>" } 
> else { sprintf("</%s>", pop @tags) } }ge' /tmp/data 
CLASS=
 <SOURCE>
    <TYPE>FILE</TYPE>
    <DEFAULT>
       <DIRNAME>${HOME}/information/logs</DIRNAME>
    </DEFAULT>
  </SOURCE>


OTHER=
 <SOURCE>
    <TYPE>FILE</TYPE>
    <DEFAULT>
       <DIRNAME>${HOME}/site/location</DIRNAME>
    </DEFAULT>
  </SOURCE>

STUDENT=
 <SOURCE>
    <TYPE>FILE</TYPE>
    <DEFAULT>
       <DIRNAME>/opt/students</DIRNAME>
    </DEFAULT>
  </SOURCE>
share|improve this answer
    
yay. we have a parsing issue that bash is not really suited for, and now we have converted it into a version that resembles broken XML so we can have all the brittleness of treating XML as plaintext too. I wouldn't recommend this: this is adding complexity –  sehe Nov 10 '11 at 11:20
    
I tried to hedge this with all the necessary caveats; I maintain that there are points on the time/complexity/effort/cost scale where this approach will make sense. I totally agree that the XML should not be broken; I merely wanted to demonstrate that if the input is regular, it is a small effort indeed. I could suggest how to fix it, and if the OP wants to proceed down this path, I will be happy to do that, but the answer also depends on the OP's needs and preferences. –  tripleee Nov 10 '11 at 11:50

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