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I have a collection of objects stored in a List.

I would like to address the an object by using a string name instead of an integer.

List<Foo> fooList = new List<Foo>;
Foo item = fooList["Foo Name"]

instead of:

List<Foo> fooList = new List<Foo>;
Foo item = fooList[0]

I was thinking that I need to create a collection class that inherits from List, but from there, I'm not sure.

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What about a Dictionary? –  Jon Nov 9 '11 at 21:49

7 Answers 7

up vote 13 down vote accepted

Dictionary<string, Foo> is the type you want.

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Arghhhhh! I knew it would be simple ;p –  ChandlerPelhams Nov 9 '11 at 21:49
1  
nice thing is, you can use any object as the key, not just string or int –  Muad'Dib Nov 9 '11 at 21:51

Joren's answer is the go-to, but if you need to preserve sequential order for some other logic, AND the name you want to refer to the object by can be a member of that object, than a little Linq can also do the trick:

List<Foo> fooList = new List<Foo>;
Foo item = fooList.FirstOrDefault(f=>f.Name == "Foo Name");

You could put this into an "indexer" property of a custom collection that derives from list:

public class MyList:List<Foo>
{
   public Foo this[string name]
   {
      get { return this.FirstOrDefault(f=>f.Name == "Foo Name"); }
   }
}

...which allows you to get your exact desired syntax, while maintaining sequential ordering (which is not guaranteed with a Dictionary)

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You can always use a Dictionary. Then you can do:

var fooList = new Dictionary<string, Foo>();
fooList.Add("Foo Name", new Foo());
var item = fooList["Foo Name"];
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You can just use a Dictionary<string,Your_Object_type>;

Since you don't care about sequential order, this is the easiest way to go.

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Instead of a List<T>, you need a Dictionary<TKey, TValue>.

Dictionary<string, Foo> fooDictionary = new Dictionary<string, Foo>();

fooDictionary.Add("Foo Name", new Foo());
Foo myFoo = fooDictionary["Foo Name"];
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you need to write your own indexer like

    public datat-type this[int x]
    {
    get{
    //getter code
    }
    set{
    //Setter code
    }
    }
    public data-type this[string x]
    {
    get{
    //setter code
    }
    set{
    //setter doe
    }
    }
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In and of itself, this will accomplish nothing. The core logic to turn "foo name" into 0 is the more important part of the logic. –  Gregory A Beamer Nov 9 '11 at 21:57
    
he also stated that if he inherits to make a new class –  Amritpal Singh Nov 9 '11 at 21:59

Instead of using a dictionary, one could use List.Find with a predicate. Note, this is an alternative to dictionary but gives flexibility on how the item (object) is found. Name would be a string property of Foo.

Example:

List<Foo> fooList = new List<Foo>; 
Foo item = fooList["Foo Name"] 

//Find Using Inline 
Foo foo = fooList.Find(delegate(Foo f) { return f.Name == "Foo Name"; });
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