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In the code below, I give two main classes - TestWorks, and TestCompilesButFails. I'm not sure I understand the failure - it would appear that the Arrays.asList() expression is being given type "List of AbstractBaseClass", but why would it ever be correct to give a type here that references a package-local class in another package?

// failing test class
import somepackage.*;
import java.util.Arrays;

public class TestCompilesButFails {
    public static void main(String [] args){
        // fails here with java.lang.IllegalAccessError: 
        // tried to access class somepackage.AbstractBaseClass 
        // from class TestCompilesButFails
        for (Object o : Arrays.asList(new ConcreteA(), new ConcreteB())) { 
            System.out.println(o);
        }
    }
}


// package-local abstract base class
package somepackage;

abstract class AbstractBaseClass {
    public abstract void doSomething();
}

// next two classes - public extenders of abstract base class
package somepackage;

public class ConcreteA extends AbstractBaseClass {
    public void doSomething(){
        System.out.print("Look, ma!\n");
    }
}

package somepackage;

public class ConcreteB extends AbstractBaseClass {
    public void doSomething(){
        System.out.print("No types!\n");
    }
}

// working test 
import somepackage.*;

public class TestWorks {
    public static void main(String [] args){
        new ConcreteA().doSomething();
        new ConcreteB().doSomething();
    }
}
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Just to eliminate another factor - replacing Arrays.asList() with private static <T> List<T> myAsList(T first, T second) gives the same problem - it has nothing to do with varargs in Arrays.asList() –  nerdytenor Nov 10 '11 at 0:38

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Because the type inference algorithm specified in the Java Language Specification does not take into account type visibility:

A supertype constraint T :> X implies that the solution is one of supertypes of X. Given several such constraints on T, we can intersect the sets of supertypes implied by each of the constraints, since the type parameter must be a member of all of them. We can then choose the most specific type that is in the intersection.

As for why they defined it that way, I suspect it was to avoid making an already quite complex algorithm more complex for the sole purpose of handling rare corner cases. After all, they also write:

Note also that type inference does not affect soundness in any way. If the types inferred are nonsensical, the invocation will yield a type error. The type inference algorithm should be viewed as a heuristic, designed to perfdorm well in practice. If it fails to infer the desired result, explicit type paramneters may be used instead.

Which in your case would be:

    for (Object o : Arrays.<Object>asList(new ConcreteA(), new ConcreteB())) { 
        System.out.println(o);
    }
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Thanks for finding the relevant portion in the java spec - I suspected it was just finding the most 'specific' common ancestor without regards to visibility. –  nerdytenor Nov 10 '11 at 15:24
    
I'm still not sure why specifying the most specific visible ancestor would be more complicated in practice... I'll have to think about that. –  nerdytenor Nov 10 '11 at 15:25

I think what you're referring to is java's "package protected" classification; a method or variable which is not declared to be public, private, or protected is thereby "package protected", and can therefore be accessed by any class in that package. It's not used that much (thankfully), and I don't think it was a good default, but it's been that way since Java 1.0.

share|improve this answer
    
Changed my question to refer to package local to be more explicit. My question remains, though. –  nerdytenor Nov 9 '11 at 23:52
    
As an aside, I find package local classes to be extremely useful. –  nerdytenor Nov 9 '11 at 23:54
    
Try not to use package scope unless really necessary. It hurts re-usability. –  Steven Nov 10 '11 at 1:23
    
@Steven Yes - package scope is useful when you don't want re-usability, but rather when you want information hiding at the class level. –  nerdytenor Nov 10 '11 at 15:27
    
Why would you ever want to do that other than for hack code? –  Steven Nov 10 '11 at 23:29

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