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I am trying to count how many y's in my code. Since you can see that I do have some y's in my file. but the counters are still zero. what am I doing wrong? (p.s I know they both are "if(word=="y")" I want to count n's too. shouldn't really matter here)

inline ifstream& read(ifstream& is, string f_name)
{
is.close();
is.clear();
is.open(f_name.c_str());
return is;
}

//main function
int main ()
{
string f_name=("dcl");
ifstream readfile;
read(readfile, f_name);
string temp, word;
istringstream istring;
int counter=0, total=0;
while(getline(readfile,temp))
{
    istring.str(temp);
    while(istring>>word)
    {
        cout<<word<<"_"<<endl;
        if(word=="y")
            ++counter;
        if(word=="y")
            ++total;
    }
    istring.clear();
}
cout<<counter<<" "<<total<<" "<<endl;
return 0;   
}

and my output is

Date_
9am_
Break_
Lunch_
Walk_
Break_
---------------------------------------------------_
11/09/11_
y_
y_
y_
y_ 
y_
_
0 0 

my input codes:

//check list for daily activities
#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <fstream>
#include <stdexcept>
using namespace std;
//inline function
inline ofstream& write(ofstream& input, string& f_name); //write to a file function
inline void tofile(ofstream& w2file, const string& s);  //output format
//main function
int main ()
{
string f_name="dcl";
cout<<"date: "<<ends;
string temp;
cin>>temp;
ofstream checklist;
write(checklist,f_name);
tofile(checklist,temp);
cout<<"start the day at 9am? [y/n]"<<ends;
cin>>temp;
tofile(checklist,temp);
cout<<"a break every 1 hr? [y/n]: "<<ends;
cin>>temp;
tofile(checklist,temp);
cout<<"lunch at noon? [y/n]: "<<ends;
cin>>temp;
tofile(checklist,temp);
cout<<"20 min walk? [y/n]: "<<ends;
cin>>temp;
tofile(checklist,temp);
cout<<"a break every 1 hr in the afternoon? [y/n]: "<<ends;
cin>>temp;
tofile(checklist,temp);
checklist<<endl;
cout<<endl;
return 0;
}

inline ofstream& write(ofstream& input, string& f_name)
{
input.close();
input.clear();
input.open(f_name.c_str(),ofstream::app);
return input;
}

inline void tofile(ofstream& w2file, const string& s)
{
w2file<<s<<"\t"<<ends;
}
share|improve this question
    
Your code works for me (after adding the appropriate headers that is). I stripped the _'s off your output to make a text file, compiled the program, and ran it and got a result of "5 5". –  wollw Nov 10 '11 at 2:48
    
When I make the program compilable and populate the file with some "y" lines, I get "5 5 " as the final output as expected. –  aschepler Nov 10 '11 at 2:52
    
maybe it's my charactor encoding? when I open dcl with gedit. it has some weird boxes that have numbers in it. –  ihm Nov 10 '11 at 3:01

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The problem is with your tofile function in your program to generate the DCL file. When writing each line you're basically separating each field by a tab character, followed by a null character by doing << "\t" << ends; and then later reading the line and using it with istringstream but istringstream separates by space characters. So, you need change "\t" to " " and drop the << ends.

inline void tofile(ofstream& w2file, const string& s)
{
    w2file << s << " ";
}
share|improve this answer
    
As a side note you only need one if... You can do this: if( 0 == word.compare("y") ) ++counter, ++total; –  druciferre Nov 10 '11 at 2:50
1  
The == operator works fine for string and char*. –  Ernest Friedman-Hill Nov 10 '11 at 2:50
    
still get 0 0; is it because I compiled it in linux? do I need to save it as a txt file? I just touch'ed dcl(file name) –  ihm Nov 10 '11 at 2:58
    
I compiled your program as-is on a linux system and I get 5, 5. Can you show your original "dcl" file? –  druciferre Nov 10 '11 at 3:06
1  
ends is a null character which will be the end of the string. istringstring separates by spaces, it does not look for null characters. –  druciferre Nov 10 '11 at 3:25

If I add the appropriate includes and a "using namespace std" to the beginning of your source and compile with g++, then run it against your output as the contents of the file "dcl", it prints "5 5" at the end -- i.e., your code works fine. Your input must be extremely peculiar somehow...

share|improve this answer
    
I updated with my input codes. –  ihm Nov 10 '11 at 3:07

Try std::count(word.begin(), word.end(), 'y') to count the occurences of 'y' inside a word and accumulate that to a total counter.

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