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I've been able to do this before, and I don't know what changed between two weeks ago and the last windows update, but for some reason SetPixelFormat isn't creating an alpha channel.

gDebugger shows that the window's back buffer only has 3 channels.

White+0 alpha renders as white.

So there is something inherently wrong with what I was doing, or an update broke it.

The code below should be paste-able into an empty VS project.

#include <Windows.h>
#include <dwmapi.h>
#include <gl/GL.h>

#pragma comment(lib,"opengl32.lib")
#pragma comment(lib,"dwmapi.lib")

HWND hWnd = 0;
HDC hDC = 0;
HGLRC hRC = 0;
LRESULT CALLBACK    WndProc(HWND, UINT, WPARAM, LPARAM);

int APIENTRY WinMain(
    HINSTANCE hInstance,
    HINSTANCE hPrevInstance,
    LPSTR lpCmdLine,
    int nCmdShow
    )
{   
    WNDCLASSEX wcex = {0};

    wcex.cbSize = sizeof(WNDCLASSEX);
    wcex.lpfnWndProc    = WndProc;
    wcex.hCursor        = LoadCursor(NULL, IDC_ARROW);
    wcex.lpszClassName  = TEXT("why_class");

    RegisterClassEx(&wcex);
    // no errors

    hWnd = CreateWindowEx(
            NULL,
            TEXT("why_class"),
            TEXT("why_window"),
            WS_OVERLAPPEDWINDOW,
            128,128,
            256,256,
            NULL,
            NULL,
            hInstance,
            NULL
        );
    // no errors

    PIXELFORMATDESCRIPTOR pfd = {0};
    pfd.nSize = sizeof(pfd);
    pfd.nVersion = 1;
    pfd.dwFlags = PFD_DRAW_TO_WINDOW|
        PFD_SUPPORT_OPENGL|
        PFD_DOUBLEBUFFER|
        PFD_SUPPORT_COMPOSITION;
    pfd.cColorBits = 32;
    pfd.cAlphaBits = 8;     // need an alpha channel
    pfd.cDepthBits = 24;
    pfd.cStencilBits = 8;

    hDC = GetDC(hWnd);
    int i = ChoosePixelFormat(hDC,&pfd);
    SetPixelFormat(hDC,i,&pfd);
    // no errors

    hRC = wglCreateContext(hDC);
    // no errors

    wglMakeCurrent(hDC,hRC);
    // no errors

    // EDIT: Turn on alpha testing (which actually won't
    // fix the clear color problem below)
    glEnable(GL_BLEND);
    glBlendFunc(GL_SRC_ALPHA,GL_ONE_MINUS_SRC_ALPHA);

    // EDIT: Regardless of whether or not GL_BLEND is enabled,
    // a clear color with an alpha of 0 should (or did at one time)
    // make this window transparent

    glClearColor(
        0,0,0,  // if this is (1,1,1), the window renders
                // solid white regardless of the alpha
        0   // changing the alpha here has some effect
        );

    DWM_BLURBEHIND bb = {0};
    bb.dwFlags = DWM_BB_ENABLE|DWM_BB_TRANSITIONONMAXIMIZED;
    bb.fEnable = TRUE;
    bb.fTransitionOnMaximized = TRUE;
    DwmEnableBlurBehindWindow(hWnd,&bb);
    // no errors

    ShowWindow(hWnd, SW_SHOWNORMAL);
    UpdateWindow(hWnd);
    // no errors

    MSG msg = {0};
    while(true){
        GetMessage(&msg,NULL,NULL,NULL);
        if(msg.message == WM_QUIT){
            return (int)msg.wParam;
        }
        TranslateMessage(&msg);
        DispatchMessage(&msg);

        glClear(GL_COLOR_BUFFER_BIT|GL_DEPTH_BUFFER_BIT);

        glBegin(GL_TRIANGLES);
        // this vertex should be transparent,
        // as it was when I last built this test
        //
        // it renders as white
        glColor4f(1,1,1,0);
        glVertex2f(0,0);
        glColor4f(0,1,1,1);
        glVertex2f(1,0);
        glColor4f(1,0,1,1);
        glVertex2f(0,1);
        glEnd();

        SwapBuffers(hDC);
    }

    return (int)msg.wParam;
}

LRESULT CALLBACK WndProc(HWND hWnd, UINT message, WPARAM wParam, LPARAM lParam)
{   
    switch (message)
    {
    case WM_DESTROY:
        {
            PostQuitMessage(0);
        }return 0;
    default:
        break;
    }

    return DefWindowProc(hWnd, message, wParam, lParam);
}
share|improve this question
    
"White+0 alpha renders as white." Of course it renders white; you didn't turn on blending. Alpha doesn't mean "transparent". It means whatever you want it to mean. So if you want alpha to mean "transparent", you have to make it mean "transparent". Generally via the use of a blend mode. –  Nicol Bolas Nov 10 '11 at 3:16
    
I honestly didn't notice alpha testing wasn't on here... I wish I had screenshots of it working before, but I guess I was working with a bug that allowed it to render directly to the framebuffer that way. I enabled alpha testing to see if that would work, however it did not affect the vertex indicated (it still renders white, just now only slight transparent). However the question I have is why my window suddenly doesn't have an alpha channel -- or why everything I render looks as though windows is expecting premultiplied alpha. –  defube Nov 10 '11 at 3:32
    
@NicolBolas: I think the OP means the alpha channel to be used for window composition, i.e. transparent windows. (PFD_SUPPORT_COMPOSITION flag set). There's little influence upon how the compositor treats the alpha channel, but usually it's assumed being opacity. Some compositors assume pre-multiplied alpha, other's don't. See github.com/datenwolf/codesamples/tree/master/samples/OpenGL/… for a equivalent example for X11/GLX. –  datenwolf Nov 10 '11 at 9:26

2 Answers 2

You typically can't get a frame buffer that has both 32bits of color and 8 bits of alpha.

I have not tried your code, but would suggest to switch the color bits to 24.

pfd.cColorBits = 24;
pfd.cAlphaBits = 8;
share|improve this answer
    
In MSDN's documentation page on PIXELFORMATDESCRIPTOR, under cAlphaBits, it says: "Specifies the number of alpha bitplanes in each RGBA color buffer. Alpha bitplanes are not supported." Does that mean you can't get an alpha channel? –  JWWalker Nov 10 '11 at 17:11
    
@JWWalker: I have no idea what that bit of the doc means. –  Bahbar Nov 10 '11 at 19:36
    
Thanks for your answers. I still end up with a 24-bit color buffer without alpha, even if I just leave the whole thing 0 (except the flags, version, and size). The only difference being that if I specify any number for cAlphaBits, the window actually does render transparently (with the asinine premultiplied alpha nonsense), I just don't have access to the alpha channel. –  defube Nov 10 '11 at 20:00
    
@i_photon: how do you check what you get ? It can't be transparent if it does not have an alpha channel, no ? –  Bahbar Nov 10 '11 at 22:08
    
I use GetPixelFormat and DescribePixelFormat, as well as gDebugger (which probably does the same thing at some point). As far as the window transparency: I think windows reserves a separate, inaccessible (as far as I know) alpha image for the DWM and layered windows. –  defube Nov 11 '11 at 2:51

If you want to use blending, just call:

glEnable(GL_BLEND);
glBlendFunc(GL_SRC_ALPHA, GL_ONE_MINUS_SRC_ALPHA);

Although for this to work, you do have to have something behind your triangle to blend with (the black background doesn't count!)

share|improve this answer
    
The black background counts as well. You can render semi-transparent white square and perfectly see it. –  Krom Stern Nov 14 '11 at 9:40

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