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Maybe the C++ and Java people can help me to define this problem I'm going to explain. I have a problem in Ada (you don't need to know it, I'm just interested in the concept) on how representing a Constructor of a class which implements three main branches of dynamic identifiers:

  • Pure number values (int, float, String, whatever)
  • List/stack item
  • Something what in C++ is likely a thread (in Ada we have a more wide concept of this, related to a task, but we can concept a simple task as a thread, so the concept applies too)

I'm gonna call this class Par_Class, and be any constructed object call Par_Obj. Thus, when an object Par_Obj is created (so, the number values are initialized, the lists/stacks have other lists/stacks allocated or null and the memory range for the thread execution is reserved), the OS automatically starts the execution of the new thread in parallel with my main application (and now they contend for system resources). But to simplify the example, let's suppose I'd have a class with an integer and a pointer to a string.

In C++, I could code, for example, (please correct me if I'm doing wrong)

class Par_Class {
public:
  Par_Class (int aValue, const std::string & aName);

private:
  int theValue;
  std::string theName;
};

the constructor could be implemented as

Par_Class::Par_Class (int aValue, const std::string & aName)
  : theValue(aValue)
  , theName(aName)
{
}

and finally we could instantiate this class with

Par_Class Par_Obj (23, "My object is this");

and sure this constructor method belongs to the class Par_Class and not to any other class.

Similarly, in Java, we could code

public class Par_Class {
  private int theValue;
  private String theName;

  public Par_Class (int aValue, String aName){
    theValue = aValue;
    theName = aName;
  }
};

and we could instantiate the object using

Par_Class Par_Obj = new Par_Class (23, "My object is this");

(again please correct me if I'm wrong). Again, Par_Class constructor is a method of the class Par_Class.

In Ada 2005, this class could be coded as

--par_pkg.ads
package Par_Pkg is
   type Par_Class is tagged private;
   type Par_Class_Ptr is access all Par_Class;
   type Integer_Ptr is access Integer;

   function Construct 
     (P : access Par_Class; aValue : Integer; aName : Integer_Ptr)
      return Par_Class_Ptr;

private
   type Par_Class is tagged
      record
         theValue : Integer;
         theName  : Integer_Ptr;
      end record;
end Par_Pkg;

-- par_pkg.adb
package body Par_Pkg is
   function Construct 
     (P : access Par_Class; aValue : Integer; aName : Integer_Ptr)
      return Par_Class_Ptr is
      pragma Unreferenced (P);
      P_Ptr : constant Par_Class_Ptr := new Par_Class;
   begin
      P_Ptr.theValue := aValue;
      P_Ptr.theName := aName;
      return P_Ptr;
   end Construct;

end Par_Pkg;

and the user could call

with Par_Pkg; use Par_Pkg;
procedure Par_Main is
   Par_Obj : Par_Class_Ptr;
   Int_Obj : Integer_Ptr;
begin
   Int_Obj := new Integer;
   Int_Obj.all := 12; -- don't worry about been string or integer
   Par_Obj := Par_Obj.Construct 
     (aValue => 23,
      aName => Int_Obj);
end Par_Main;

And that's where resides the problem. The compiler says me that I could not use the method Construct in Par_Obj := Par_Obj.Construct because yet my object is null. But it's so obvious, because just what I want to do is to initialize the object (so it would not be null anymore). There are other ways of constructing the object, for example, using a function from outside the class, but I don't want to use this approach because it runs away from architecture. Could you please help me to formulate the problem to my Ada friends so they can help me to implement it in Ada? I guess I'm having a bit difficult on explaining this in general concept terms. Thanks.

Answer

@paercebal gave me what I think could achieve my goal:

  • "Is there a way to have a "static" function declared inside Par_Class?" and "is there a way to have an non-member function declared friend of Par_Class?"

I could complete it with "is there a way to have a "static" function declared inside a tagged type? Also, could the package where the class is declared act as a friend or as a static function?"

Update

Got some more good reasons on why implementing it as suggested by @SimonWright and some people from comp.lang.ada forum:

function Construct (aValue: Integer; aName: Integer)
                    return Par_Class is
begin
  return (theValue => aValue,
          theName  => aName);
end Construct;

So I asked: In this case function Construct would behave as a C++ static function (or maybe a friend one?)?

And Dmitry Kazakov answered:

That depends on what you mean. In Ada:

  1. there is no hidden parameters

  2. an operation can be dispatching (virtual) in any combination of parameters and/or result. But an operation cannot be dispatching in more than one type (no multiple dispatch). All tags of dispatching parameters must be same (no multi-methods).

  3. there is no static or friend operations as the visibility rules are based on packages.

The function Construct above is a primitive operation, it is not a constructor.

Constructors in Ada are implicit, they consist of

  1. construction of the components (in an unspecified order, recursively);

  2. a call to Initialize if the type is a descendant of Ada.Finalization.[Limited_]Controlled. (Overridden bodies of Initialize are not called! I.e. Ada constructors do not traverse derivation path. In short, aggregation is safe, derivation is not;

  3. starting all task components. (Note, tasks are not running when Initialize is called!)

Destructors act in the reverse order: tasks - Finalize - components.

And I guess it responds. Thank you people.

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1  
I don't know Ada, so I can't help you. Still, your C++ code is wrong with a similar error: You make a copy of a string (strcpy) into a pointer that wasn't allocated. You should either use malloc/new to allocate it to the right size, and then do the strcpy. Perhaps your Ada error is similar: In Ada, do you need to "allocate" somehow your class or its record before initializing its values? –  paercebal Nov 10 '11 at 3:27
1  
And in Java code, there is no char * type. Replace it with String. In the same way, a correct C++ code would probably have a std::string instead of a char *, to avoid the whole "you need to do the allocation by hand" problem. –  paercebal Nov 10 '11 at 3:30
    
@paercebal, I've fixed where you suggested. Is that right now? Thank you. –  Rego Nov 12 '11 at 14:51
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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

About Ada constructors?

It's difficult to explain the concept as I have no idea of the philosophy, limitations and strengths of the Ada language. Still, guessing there is no constructors in Ada.

A (non-friend?) non-member function?

This is not the solution you want I guess:

  • having a Initialize member function of Par_Class, which sets the private data of Par_Class
  • having a Par_Class_Constructor non-member function calling that Initialize function

But this solution is not satisfying because it would expose Initialize as a public method, which is a breach of encapsulation (anyone could call that method at any moment, which is almost as dumb as making all the data public).

A static member function?

What you want to do is allocate and initialize your code with but one function call, without breaching encapsulation.

You feel (rightly) this function should be part of Par_Class interface, and thus, you want to declare it inside the Par_Class' declaration (which will have the interesting side-effect of giving it access to Par_Class private member variables)

In Java or in C++, barring constructors, this could be resolved by having a static method, that is, a method of the class, instead of a method of the instance. This method is static, and so has no access to this meaning you can call it without needing an instance of Par_Class.

So, your question to your Ada friends could be: is there a way to have a "static" function declared inside Par_Class?

A (friend?) non-member function?

Another way to have similar effect (if not similar syntactic sugar) would be to have a non-member function doing the trick. In C, you would have something like: Par_Class_Constructor, which would be a function returning the pointer to a struct of type Par_Class.

In C++, you could use the same trick as Java, or the same trick as C. In that last case, Par_Class_Constructor would be declared friend of the class Par_Class to have access to its private data, or could call an initialization member method which have access to that private data.

This way, you can still allocate and initialize your object with one function,and still protect the encapsulation of your class (as this method returns a new object, instead of modifying it like the unsatisfactory Initialize method described above)

So, if having a non-member function is Ok for you, another possibility could be: is there a way to have an non-member function declared friend of Par_Class?

Edit

Note: my previous, out-of-topic answer... I really should go to bed...

I don't know Ada, but reading your code:

with Par_Pkg; use Par_Pkg;
procedure Par_Main is
   Par_Obj : Par_Class_Ptr;
   Int_Obj : Integer_Ptr;
begin
   Int_Obj := new Integer;
   Int_Obj.all := 12; -- don t worry about been string or integer
   Par_Obj := Par_Obj.Construct 
     (aValue => 23,
      aName => Int_Obj);
end Par_Main;

I see Int_Obj has been allocated with the new Integer statement.

Don't you need to allocate Par_Obj the same way?

Something like (I'm inferring from your Integer initialization code):

   Par_Obj := new Par_Class_Ptr      -- allocate ?
   Par_Obj.all := Par_Obj.Construct  -- initialize ?
     (aValue => 23,
      aName => Int_Obj);

???

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1  
In this case it would not be necessary since I already make a new from inside the body of the Constructor method. It's there I do P_Ptr : constant Par_Class_Ptr := new Par_Class; where it allocates memory. –  Rego Nov 10 '11 at 3:49
    
I guess you got exactly what I wanted to understand (and ask). Thank you very much. –  Rego Nov 12 '11 at 15:00
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Par_Class (int aValue, const char *aName) is the very special C++ constructor syntax; when used the compiler generates a new blank area of memory (calling malloc() if there's a new, on the stack otherwise) and the constructor gets to fill it in.

This is not the same as

function Construct 
  (P : access Par_Class; aValue : Integer; aName : Integer_Ptr)
   return Par_Class_Ptr;

which requires there to be a previous Par_Class instance and is like having a C++ member function

Par_Class *a_Par_Class(int aValue, const char *aName);

which would fail in the same way as your current Ada code if called with an uninitialised Par_Class *.

The nearest (Ada 2012) equivalent to the constructor is I think

function Construct 
  (aValue : Integer; aName : Integer_Ptr)
   return Par_Class is
begin
   return Result : Par_Class do
      Result.theValue := aValue;
      Result.theName := aName;
   end return;
end Construct;

or, OK for Ada 95/2005 and nearest to your present scheme:

function Construct 
  (aValue : Integer; aName : Integer_Ptr)
   return Par_Class_Ptr is
   P_Ptr : constant Par_Class_Ptr := new Par_Class;
begin
   P_Ptr.theValue := aValue;
   P_Ptr.theName := aName;
   return P_Ptr;
end Construct;

@paercebal mentioned that you need a static member function, which is correct; the C++ constructor is I think syntactic sugar for this. In Ada, scoping is done at the package level, so function Construct - being declared in the public part of the same package and returning a Par_Class_Ptr - is unmistakably (architecturally) associated with Par_Class.

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With
    Ada.Text_IO;

Procedure Test is
  package Par_Pkg is
  type Par_Class is tagged private;
  type Par_Class_Ptr is access all Par_Class;
  type Integer_Ptr is access Integer;

  function Construct 
    (aValue : Integer; aName : Integer_Ptr)
  return Par_Class_Ptr;

   private
   type Par_Class is tagged
     record
        theValue : Integer;
        theName  : Integer_Ptr;
     end record;
end Par_Pkg;
----------------------------
package body Par_Pkg is
  function Construct 
    (aValue : Integer; aName : Integer_Ptr)
  return Par_Class_Ptr is
     --P_Ptr : constant Par_Class_Ptr := new Par_Class;
  begin
     Return Result: Par_Class_Ptr:= New Par_Class'( others => <> ) do
        Result.theValue := aValue;
        Result.theName := aName;
     End Return;         
  end Construct;

end Par_Pkg;
----------------------------
use Par_Pkg;

   Int_Obj : Integer_Ptr:= new Integer'(12);
   Par_Obj : Par_Class_Ptr:= Construct(aValue => 23, aName => Int_Obj);


Begin
   Ada.Text_IO.Put_Line( "Everything went fine!" );
exception
   when others => 
      Ada.Text_IO.Put_Line("Something went horribly wrong!");
End Test;

Note the changes; the constructor now returns the proper [pointer] type and never allows it to be null.

Further, the construction of the object is moved to the initialization section, rather than the body. So this ensures that the object[-pointer] is never null.

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