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For example I would see the following:

- (void) updateNotesView:(BOOL)visible animated:(BOOL)animated{

    void (^animations)(void) = ^{
        if (visible)
        {
            //do something
        }
        else
        {
            //do something
        }
     };


    void (^completion)(BOOL) = ^(BOOL finished){
        self.showingNotesView = visible;

        if (!visible)
        {
            //do something
        }
    };

}

I do not get the code that says :

void (^animations)(void) 

or

void (^completion)(BOOL) = ^(BOOL finished)

can someone please explain?

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5  
They're blocks. Basically a function wrapped in an object. –  ughoavgfhw Nov 10 '11 at 4:43
    
Blocks can be helpful in certain situations, usually ones that require an event to be triggered upon completion. UIPrintInteractionController has a completion handler built into its delegate for example. Or in animation chains, it can be used to trigger the next group or to just animate a single object. –  CodaFi Nov 10 '11 at 4:45

1 Answer 1

It's how you define a variable that will be a block or in some other cases function pointers like in c.

int (*pt2Function)(float, char, char) = NULL;   

if (pt2Function)
    pt2Function(5.0f, 'a', 'b');


 NSArray* array = [NSArray arrayWithObjects:@"a",@"b", nil];



void(^enumerateBlock)(id,NSUInteger,BOOL*) = ^(id obj, NSUInteger idx, BOOL *stop) {
    // some code
};

[array enumerateObjectsUsingBlock:enumerateBlock];

// OR

[array enumerateObjectsUsingBlock:^(id obj, NSUInteger idx, BOOL *stop) {
   // inline block 
}];

// using a typedef for code neatness

typedef void(^typedefBlockVar)(id,NSUInteger,BOOL*);

typedefBlockVar myEnumrateBlock = ^(id obj, NSUInteger idx, BOOL *stop) {
    // some code
};

[array enumerateObjectsUsingBlock:myEnumrateBlock];
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