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I cannot seem to get my try/catch to work correctly. When you implement a try/catch, it's suppose to "throw" whatever string you told it to, right? And if you want, let the program continue on. Well mine does not say what I want it to say, nor does it continue, instead it tells me this then aborts:

Debug Error!! Blah blah blah.exe R6010 -abort() has been called (Press Retry to debug the app)

I want it to say: "You are trying to add more Items than are allowed. Don't. ", then continue on with the program. It's a LinkedList, it's not suppose to allow it to have more than 30 nodes. It does stop when it tries to add more than 30, just not how I want it to. I'm not sure what I'm doing wrong, help much appreciated!

Main:
    Collection<int> list;

    for(int count=0; count < 31; count++)
    {       
        try
        {
            list.addItem(count);
            cout << count << endl;
        }
        catch(string *exceptionString)
        {
            cout << exceptionString;
            cout << "Error";
        }
    }
    cout << "End of Program.\n";

Collection.h:
template<class T>
void Collection<T>::addItem(T num)
{
    ListNode<T> *newNode;
    ListNode<T> *nodePtr;
    ListNode<T> *previousNode = NULL;

    const std::string throwStr = "You are trying to add more Items than are allowed. Don't. ";

    // If Collection has 30 Items, add no more.
    if(size == 30)
    {   
        throw(throwStr);
    }
    else
    {}// Do nothing.            

    // Allocate a new node and store num there.
    newNode = new ListNode<T>;
    newNode->item = num;
    ++size;

    // Rest of code for making new nodes/inserting in proper order
    // Placing position, etc etc.
} 
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1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You're throwing a string, but trying to catch a pointer to a string.

Change your try/catch block to this:

try
{
...
}
catch( const string& exceptionString )
{
   cout << exceptionString;
}

The reason you're getting that abort message is because you're not "catching" a type that is compatible with what you're throwing, so the exception is just bypassing your catch and is therefore an "uncaught exception", subject to the default underlying exception handler, which calls abort.

FYI a more standard way is to throw/catch a std::exception object. i.e.

try
{
...
}
catch( std::exception& e )
{
   std::cout << e.what();
}


...

throw( std::logic_error("You are trying to add more Items than are allowed. Don't.") );
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That did the trick! Thank you very much! :) –  Riotson Nov 10 '11 at 5:56

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