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How do I store a selected field value into a variable from a query and use it in an update statement?

Here is my procedure:

I'm writing a SQL Server 2005 T-SQL stored procedure which does the following:

  1. gets list of invoices id's from invoice table and stores to Cursor
  2. Fetch invoice id from cursor -> tmp_key variable
  3. foreach tmp_key finds invoice client primary contact id from customer table
  4. updates the client contact key with primary contact id
  5. close cursor

Here is my code:

DECLARE @tmp_key int
DECLARE @get_invckey cursor 

set @get_invckey = CURSOR FOR 
    select invckey from tarinvoice where confirmtocntctkey is null and tranno like '%115876'

OPEN @get_invckey 

FETCH NEXT FROM @get_invckey into @tmp_key

WHILE (@@FETCH_STATUS = 0) 
BEGIN 
    SELECT c.PrimaryCntctKey as PrimaryContactKey
    from tarcustomer c, tarinvoice i
    where i.custkey = c.custkey and i.invckey = @tmp_key

    UPDATE tarinvoice set confirmtocntctkey = PrimaryContactKey where invckey = @tmp_key
    FETCH NEXT FROM @get_invckey INTO @tmp_key
END 

CLOSE @get_invckey
DEALLOCATE @get_invckey

How do I store the PrimaryContactKey and use it again in the set clause of the following update statement? Do I create a cursor variable or just another local variable with an int type?

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6 Answers

up vote 17 down vote accepted
DECLARE @tmp_key int
DECLARE @get_invckey cursor 

SET @get_invckey = CURSOR FOR 
    SELECT invckey FROM tarinvoice WHERE confirmtocntctkey IS NULL AND tranno LIKE '%115876'

OPEN @get_invckey 

FETCH NEXT FROM @get_invckey INTO @tmp_key

DECLARE @PrimaryContactKey int --or whatever datatype it is

WHILE (@@FETCH_STATUS = 0) 
BEGIN 
    SELECT @PrimaryContactKey=c.PrimaryCntctKey
    FROM tarcustomer c, tarinvoice i
    WHERE i.custkey = c.custkey AND i.invckey = @tmp_key

    UPDATE tarinvoice SET confirmtocntctkey = @PrimaryContactKey WHERE invckey = @tmp_key
    FETCH NEXT FROM @get_invckey INTO @tmp_key
END 

CLOSE @get_invckey
DEALLOCATE @get_invckey
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I just had the same problem and...

declare @userId uniqueidentifier
set @userId = (select top 1 UserId from aspnet_Users)

or even shorter (2nd line):

SELECT TOP 1 @userId = UserId FROM aspnet_Users
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Haha, I like this. should be very simple for assigning scalar value. Hate cursors bla3.. Luckly googling found this little answer. –  CallMeLaNN May 13 '11 at 7:18
2  
I don't know because set @userId = (select top 1 UserId from aspnet_Users) without bracket will lead to "incorrect syntax near select"! –  CallMeLaNN May 13 '11 at 7:20
    
This forum shows the proper approach for top: sqlservercentral.com/Forums/Topic496124-169-1.aspx –  Chip McCormick Oct 29 '13 at 22:37
1  
Note that the use of the cursor above is not related to the question of how to assign to a variable. Unfortunately that makes this a confusing question. –  Chip McCormick Oct 29 '13 at 22:39
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Try This

SELECT @PrimaryContactKey = c.PrimaryCntctKey
FROM tarcustomer c, tarinvoice i
WHERE i.custkey = c.custkey 
    AND i.invckey = @tmp_key

UPDATE tarinvoice SET confirmtocntctkey = @PrimaryContactKey 
WHERE invckey = @tmp_key
FETCH NEXT FROM @get_invckey INTO @tmp_key

You would declare this variable outside of your loop as just a standard TSQL variable.

I should also note that this is how you would do it for any type of select into a variable, not just when dealing with cursors.

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Why do you need a cursor at all? Your entire segment of code can be replaced by this, which will run a lot faster on large numbers of rows.

UPDATE tarinvoice set confirmtocntctkey = PrimaryCntctKey 
FROM tarinvoice INNER JOIN tarcustomer ON tarinvoice.custkey = tarcustomer.custkey
WHERE confirmtocntctkey is null and tranno like '%115876'
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Are cursors really frowned upon? –  phill May 4 '09 at 14:11
2  
They're slow. SQL Server is optimised for set-based queries. It's faster for it to operate on a million rows in one query than to operate on one row a million times. Add to that the overhead that cursors have, and you're asking for major performance problems by using cursors rather than set-based operations Test your cursor solution and my query, see what the execution times of the two are. –  GilaMonster May 8 '09 at 8:53
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In order to assign a variable safely you have to use the SET-SELECT statement:

SET @PrimaryContactKey = (SELECT c.PrimaryCntctKey
    FROM tarcustomer c, tarinvoice i
    WHERE i.custkey = c.custkey 
    AND i.invckey = @tmp_key)

Make sure you have both a starting and an ending parenthesis!

The reason the SET-SELECT version is the safest way to set a variable is twofold.

1. The SELECT returns several posts

What happens if the following select results in several posts?

SELECT @PrimaryContactKey = c.PrimaryCntctKey
FROM tarcustomer c, tarinvoice i
WHERE i.custkey = c.custkey 
    AND i.invckey = @tmp_key

@PrimaryContactKey will be assigned the value from the last post in the result.

In fact @PrimaryContactKey will be assigned one value per post in the result, so it will consequently contain the value of the last post the SELECT-command was processing.

Which post is "last" is determined by any clustered indexes or, if no clustered index is used or the primary key is clustered, the "last" post will be the most recently added post. This behavior could, in a worst case scenario, be altered every time the indexing of the table is changed.

With a SET-SELECT statement your variable will be set to null.

2. The SELECT returns no posts

What happens, when using the second version of the code, if your select does not return a result at all?

In a contrary to what you may believe the value of the variable will not be null - it will retain it's previous value!

This is because, as stated above, SQL will assign a value to the variable once per post - meaning it won't do anything with the variable if the result contains no posts. So, the variable will still have the value it had before you ran the statement.

With the SET-SELECT statement the value will be null.

See also: T-SQL - SET versus SELECT when assigning variables?

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Erk is correct and this should have been marked as answer. The second point is what caught me recently... –  wexman Mar 14 at 12:27
    
@wexman: why, thank you! I've had my run-ins with #2 as well... –  Erk Apr 17 at 10:43
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Cursors are great and all, but once the data gets bigger that cursor is going to slow down tremendiously.

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1  
His question really doesn't have anything to do with cursors despite what he says. The same problem (putting the value of a select into a variable) is something that is used in numerous other instances. –  TheTXI Apr 30 '09 at 16:36
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