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Given a scenario where a page/control should display different views (like tabs) in different circumstances (query string argument, postback from a control, user setting retrieved from the database) I would normally put a control like MultiView or Placeholder and switch the active view index or the Visible property like this:

<%@ Page Language="C#" AutoEventWireup="true" CodeBehind="WebForm2.aspx.cs" Inherits="TestWebApplication.WebForm2" %>

<%@ Register Src="SomeControl.ascx" TagName="SomeControl" TagPrefix="uc1" %>
<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-transitional.dtd">
<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
<head runat="server">
    <title></title>
</head>
<body>
    <form id="form1" runat="server">
    <div>
        <asp:PlaceHolder runat="server" ID="phControl" Visible="false">
            <uc1:SomeControl ID="SomeControl1" runat="server" />
        </asp:PlaceHolder>
        <asp:PlaceHolder runat="server" ID="phNotControl" Visible="false">
             Some other content
        </asp:PlaceHolder>
    </div>
    </form>
</body>
</html>

And I would switch the views in a code behind depending on the logic like this:

using System;

namespace TestWebApplication
{
    public partial class WebForm2 : System.Web.UI.Page
    {
        protected void Page_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            phControl.Visible = false;
            phNotControl.Visible = true;
        }
    }
}

This is the control:

<%@ Control Language="C#" AutoEventWireup="true" CodeBehind="SomeControl.ascx.cs" Inherits="TestWebApplication.SomeControl" EnableViewState="false" %>
I am the control

And the code behind of the control:

using System;

namespace TestWebApplication
{
    public partial class SomeControl : System.Web.UI.UserControl
    {
        protected void Page_Init(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            Response.Write("I am the control's Init and I am executing heavy operations <br />");
        }

        protected void Page_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            Response.Write("I am the control's Load <br />");
        }

        protected void Page_PreRender(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            Response.Write("I am the control's PreRender and I am only called if the control is Visible <br />");
        }
    }
}

However what if the control in question has some relatively heavy work to do (calling the database) in its init and load events? They get executed even if the control is not Visible and will slow down the page. One possible solution I see is moving all the work in the PreRender method of the child control because it is not executed for controls which are not visible. However this will not work if the control accepts user input from some dynamically populated control (think of dropdownlist) because the logic that populates the dropdown with options will not be executed.

I've come up with the following solutions:

  • Move the heavy work in the PreRender method and wrap it in an if(!IsPostBack). Then let the ViewState hold the possible values for the dropdown and ASP.NET will restore it. The downside is that it is using ViewState and bumping up the size of the page.

  • Create the control dynamically with LoadControl and add it in the placeholder from code behind. This will trigger catch up events and the code that populates the dropdown can be put in the Init method where it belongs. The downside is that the layout is defined in the code behind. Looking at the markup one cannot see what controls are on the page and looking at the code behind it is not clear where the control will appear. It also makes styling and other "design" operations more difficult.

  • Leave it like it is. The downside is that there will be additional database queries and if there are a lot of views these would add up.

My actual question is how I solve this problem without putting stuff in the ViewState, without multiple queries and without dragging my layout into the code behind.

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2 Answers 2

Could it be a solution to make an AJAX call for your heavy database work?

Then you could display the View and in the background load the data you need and display it. The page would load really fast and you could display some indication that data is currently being loaded.

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Yes but this was not the answer I was looking for. First of all this is equiavalent to creating the control dynamically in C# except that you create it in JS. You still can't clearly see the flow in the ASP.NET markup. Second what if I don't want to do it with AJAX for some reason (for example SEO or some mobile view) Thanks for the answer. –  Stilgar Nov 10 '11 at 9:51

How about creating a public method on in your user controls, such as InitControl(). Do all the heavy work within InitControl() instead on page load. Then, on parent page, when page is being shown, call InitControl.

using System;

namespace TestWebApplication
{
    public partial class WebForm2 : System.Web.UI.Page
    {
        protected void Page_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            phControl.Visible = false;
            phNotControl.Visible = true;
            SomeControl1.InitControl();
        }
    }
}

Don't do any work within OnLoad event of your user controls.

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