Dismiss
Announcing Stack Overflow Documentation

We started with Q&A. Technical documentation is next, and we need your help.

Whether you're a beginner or an experienced developer, you can contribute.

Sign up and start helping → Learn more about Documentation →

Variadic templates will enable the rewriting of certain kind of functions into cleaner, type-safe versions. It is the case of printf, as the example given on Wikipedia:

void printf(const char *s)
{
    while (*s) {
        if (*s == '%' && *(++s) != '%')
            throw std::runtime_error("invalid format string: missing arguments");
        std::cout << *s++;
    }
}

template<typename T, typename... Args>
void printf(const char *s, T value, Args... args)
{
    while (*s) {
        if (*s == '%' && *(++s) != '%') {
            std::cout << value;
            ++s;
            printf(s, args...); // call even when *s == 0 to detect extra arguments
            return;
        }
        std::cout << *s++;
    }
    throw std::logic_error("extra arguments provided to printf");
}

But... As far as I understand templates, they imply code duplication for each type combination. So the variadic version of the above printfs would be copied many times. This could be terrible for large functions or classes.

Are variadic template as perilous as standard templates for code duplication? If yes, can the inheritance trick still help?

share|improve this question
    
Of course, you should not write "large functions" to begin with. Prefer small ones. – Martin Ba Nov 10 '11 at 13:11
1  
You basically get the same bloat as from using templates. If you instantiate a template for two different things then you get two copies. And for both templates and variadic templates the optimizer can inline things, which could increase size again (or decrease it, for that matter). – bames53 Nov 10 '11 at 15:38
up vote 10 down vote accepted

The short answer is: the "you only pay for what you use" principle still applies exactly as before.

The longer answer can be seen by comparing the generated code for two hypothetical implementations e.g.

#include <iostream>

template <typename T>
void func1(T& v) {
  v = -10;
}

template <typename T1, typename T2>
void func1(T1& v1, T2& v2) {
  func1(v1); func1(v2);
}

// More unused overloads....
template <typename T1, typename T2, typename T3>
void func1(T1& v1, T2& v2, T3& v3) {
  func1(v1); func1(v2); func1(v3);
}

int main() {
  double d;
  int i;
  func1(d);
  func1(i);
  std::cout << "i=" << i << ", d=" << d << std::endl;
  func1(d,i);
  std::cout << "i=" << i << ", d=" << d << std::endl;
}

With a modern compiler this pretty much reduces to exactly what you'd have written if you wanted to avoid templates all together. In this "traditional" C++03 templated code my version of g++ inlines (in the compiler, not keyword sense) the whole lot and there's no obvious hint that the initializations are done via reference in a template function, several times, in different ways.

Compared with the equivalent variadic approach:

#include <iostream>
#include <functional>

void func1() {
  // end recursion
}

template <typename T, typename ...Args>
void func1(T& v, Args&... args) {
  v = -10;
  func1(args...);
}

int main() {
  double d;
  int i;
  func1(d);
  func1(i);
  std::cout << "i=" << i << ", d=" << d << std::endl;
  func1(d,i);
  std::cout << "i=" << i << ", d=" << d << std::endl;
}

This also produces almost identical code - some of the labels and mangled names are different as you'd expect, but the diff of the generated asm produced by g++ -Wall -Wextra -S (a 4.7 snapshot) has no significant differences. The compiler basically is writing all of the overloads your program requires on the fly and then optimizing as before.

The following non template code also produces almost identical output:

#include <iostream>
#include <functional>

int main() {
  double d;
  int i;
  d= -10; i=-10;
  std::cout << "i=" << i << ", d=" << d << std::endl;
  d= -10; i=-10;
  std::cout << "i=" << i << ", d=" << d << std::endl;
}

Here again the only noticeable differences are the labels and symbol names.

The point is a modern compiler can do "what's right" without much hassle in template code. If what you're expressing is simple underneath all the template mechanics the output will be simple. If it's not then the output will be more substantial, but so would the output be if you'd avoided templates entirely.

Where this gets interesting (in my view) however is this: all of my statements were qualified with something like "with an decent modern compiler". If you're writing variadic templates you can almost be certain that what you're using to compile is a decent modern compiler. No clunky old relic compilers support variadic templates.

share|improve this answer

It could certainly be a problem. One thing that could help is to factor out the common parts:

const char *process(const char *s)
{
  while (*s) {
      if (*s == '%' && *(++s) != '%') {
          ++s;
          return s;
      }
      std::cout << *s++;
  }
  throw std::logic_error("extra arguments provided to printf");
}

template<typename T>
inline const char *process(const char *s,T value)
{
  s = process(s);
  std::cout << value;
  return s;
}

template<typename T, typename... Args>
inline void printf(const char *s, T value, Args... args)
{
  printf(process(s,value),args...);
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.