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I realise that bitwise shifting is faster in theory than multiplication and division in AS3 (I am also interested in the answer when compiling to AIR).

For example: a << 3 vs a * 8

However I am wary that post-compilation this may not be the case, I don't know exactly how flash compiles AS3 but I have a feeling they would swap where possible expressions for their bitwise equivalents.

Is there any evidence to suggest that after being compiled a bitwise operation is faster?

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2  
Unless you think a few milliseconds as faster, there is no difference. You might as well keep your code readable and save other programmers the headache :) –  Pranav Hosangadi Nov 10 '11 at 12:06
    
@PranavHosangadi I understand this but I am developing a quad tree collision engine which divides and multiplies by powers of two many many times a second so a few milliseconds becomes a big difference over many thousands of use. It is also to be compiled for AIR to mobile devices where memory is limited. –  George Reith Nov 11 '11 at 9:18
    
hmmm... In that case, you could use the bitwise operators. Ref. Timofei's answer below, you find a diference of 12ms over 30 million iterations, so I still believe this will not make a big difference –  Pranav Hosangadi Nov 11 '11 at 9:40

1 Answer 1

up vote 7 down vote accepted

I've made some tests.

Test1:

var t:Number = getTimer();
for (var i:Number=0; i<30000000; i++) {
    var a:uint = Math.round(Math.random()*100);
    a *= 8;
}
var t1:Number = getTimer()-t;
trace(t1);

Output:

[trace] 8999

Test2:

var t : Number = getTimer();
for (var i:Number=0; i<30000000; i++) {
    var a:uint = Math.round(Math.random()*100);
    a <<= 3;
}
var t1:Number = getTimer()-t;
trace(t1);

Output:

[trace] 8987

Test3:

var t:Number = getTimer();
for (var i:Number=0; i<30000000; i++) {
    var a:uint = Math.round(Math.random()*100);
    a *= 13;
}
var t1:Number = getTimer()-t;
trace(t1);

Output:

[trace] 8918

So, as you see, you have no need to worry about such things, compiler will do it for you.

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2  
While I certainly agree that this will never be an issue, your test is skewed since it does things that takes several orders of magnitude longer than the thing you are testing in each iteration of the loop. This means that any benefits from using bitwise may be hidden behind noise from the other actions. –  Jonatan Hedborg Nov 10 '11 at 13:05
    
Thanks Timofei but I think the tests would be better by using a fixed variable set outside the loop before the timer and by explicitly writing the equations like so: var b = a << 3 instead of a <<= 3. –  George Reith Nov 10 '11 at 15:38

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