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Instead of defining a fixed width of a div, I want to specify a minimum width (if the content is very less), and a maximum width (if the content is more, hide the extra content).

For example, my html is:

<div class="container">
    <div class="test">x</div>
</div>

CSS:

.container{
    padding:10px; 
    border:1px solid red; 
    width:200px; 
    text-align:center;
}

.test{
    border:1px solid green; 
}

As you can see, the container has the fixed width of 200px. I want to place the test div in the center of container. Since there is only a single letter in the test class, so I want that the test class should be minimum 50px, but maximum 100px.

I've tried min-width and max-width, but couldn't make it work. Here is the jsfiddle link.

Thanks for any help.

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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Here you go!

By using the margin:0 auto; you can get it centralised :) (Just remove it if you dont want it centered)

http://jsfiddle.net/SnhhK/4/

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Thanks, but min-width does not really work in the example. I want to do that if the content inside the test is very less like 1 character, then the minimum width should be 50px. if the content is more and does not fit, then the width of test div should increase but should not be more than 100px. Hope you get my point. –  Billa Nov 10 '11 at 11:30
    
OK, well if thats the case (if i understand correctly :P) then you dont need the min-width, just set the width, and then display:block. Ive updated this example jsfiddle.net/SnhhK/5 –  Graeme Leighfield Nov 10 '11 at 11:54
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Using min and max-width on the ,test element worked for me.

http://jsfiddle.net/Kyle_Sevenoaks/SnhhK/1/

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