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I'm executing an external script, using a <script> inside <head>.

Now since the script executes before the page has loaded, I can't access the <body>, among other things. I'd like to execute some JavaScript after the document has been "loaded" (HTML fully downloaded and in-RAM). Are there any events that I can hook onto when my script executes, that will get triggered on page load?

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18 Answers 18

up vote 245 down vote accepted

These solutions will work:

<body onload="script();">

or

document.onload = function ...

or even

window.onload = function ...

Note that the last option is a better way to go since it is unobstrusive and is considered more standard.

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1  
What is the difference between <body onload="script();"> and document.onload=function ... ? –  Mentoliptus Aug 16 '11 at 10:14
7  
@mentoliptus: document.onload= is non obtrusive en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unobtrusive_JavaScript –  marcgg Sep 5 '11 at 10:05
    
thank you for the clarification –  Mentoliptus Sep 8 '11 at 10:05
    
script in the html ...no no no $(function() { code here }); <- javascript.js can be placed in head and will load after DOM –  gerdi Jan 17 '14 at 13:12
8  
@gerdi OP didn't mention anything about jQuery. I also gave an unobtrusive option in my answer. –  marcgg Jan 29 '14 at 14:48

Reasonably portable, non-framework way of having your script set a function to run at load time:

if(window.attachEvent) {
    window.attachEvent('onload', yourFunctionName);
} else {
    if(window.onload) {
        var curronload = window.onload;
        var newonload = function() {
            curronload();
            yourFunctionName();
        };
        window.onload = newonload;
    } else {
        window.onload = yourFunctionName;
    }
}
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4  
+1 for posting almost exactly what I had to come up with 6 months ago. Code like this can be necessary if other frameworks and code that you have no control over are adding onload events and you want to as well without wiping out the other onload events. I included my implementation as a function and it required var newonload = function(evt) { curronload(evt); newOnload(evt); } because for some reason the framework I am using requires an event to be passed to the onload event. –  Grant Wagner Apr 30 '09 at 21:07
4  
I just discovered in testing that the code as written results in handlers being fired in an undefined order when attached with attachEvent(). If order-of-handler-execution is important you may want to leave out the window.attachEvent branch. –  Grant Wagner May 4 '09 at 20:00
    
@Grant Wagner: Interesting! Good find. –  chaos May 4 '09 at 20:37

You can put a "onload" attribute inside the body

...<body onload="myFunction()">...

Or if you are using jQuery, you can do

$(document).ready(function(){ /*code here*/ }) 

or 

$(window).load(function(){ /*code here*/ })

I hope it answer your question.

Note that the $(window).load will execute after the document is rendered on your page.

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Look at hooking document.onload or in jQuery $(document).load(...).

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Is this event reliable? (Cross browser.. IE6+ FF2+ etc) –  Jarvis Apr 30 '09 at 16:41
1  
Yes this is cross-browser, standard DOM. –  Daniel A. White Apr 30 '09 at 16:43
9  
It's actually window.onload that's more standard, not document.onload. AFAIK –  Peter Bailey Apr 30 '09 at 16:48
1  
Thanks for your correction. –  Daniel A. White Apr 30 '09 at 16:51
<script type="text/javascript">
   function downloadJSAtOnload() {
   var element = document.createElement("script");
   element.src = "deferredfunctions.js";
   document.body.appendChild(element);
 }
  if (window.addEventListener)
      window.addEventListener("load", downloadJSAtOnload, false);
  else if (window.attachEvent)
      window.attachEvent("onload", downloadJSAtOnload);
  else window.onload = downloadJSAtOnload;
</script>
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Using the YUI library (I love it):

YAHOO.util.Event.onDOMReady(function(){
    //your code
});

Portable and beautiful! However, if you don't use YUI for other stuff (see its doc) I would say that it's not worth to use it.

N.B. : to use this code you need to import 2 scripts

<script type="text/javascript" src="http://yui.yahooapis.com/2.7.0/build/yahoo/yahoo-min.js" ></script>
<script type="text/javascript" src="http://yui.yahooapis.com/2.7.0/build/event/event-min.js" ></script>
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<body onload="myFunction()">

This code works well.

But window.onload method has various dependencies. So it may not work all the time.

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Best method, recommended by Google also. :)

<script type="text/javascript">
  function downloadJSAtOnload() {
   var element = document.createElement("script");
   element.src = "defer.js";
   document.body.appendChild(element);
  }
  if (window.addEventListener)
   window.addEventListener("load", downloadJSAtOnload, false);
  else if (window.attachEvent)
   window.attachEvent("onload", downloadJSAtOnload);
  else window.onload = downloadJSAtOnload;
</script>

http://www.feedthebot.com/pagespeed/defer-loading-javascript.html

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Just define <body onload="aFunction()"> that will be called after the page has been loaded. Your code in the script is than enclosed by aFunction() { }

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I was too hasty and forgot to use &amp;lt; instead of &lt;. Sorry, but it all went soo fast –  Norbert Hartl Apr 30 '09 at 16:46
    
Well is it different in comments? <bla> –  Norbert Hartl Apr 30 '09 at 16:47

If the scripts are within the tags, you can add 'defer' to the end of the first script tag like so:

Quote from w3schools:

Definition and Usage The defer attribute is a boolean attribute.

When present, it specifies that the script is executed when the page has finished parsing.

Note: The defer attribute is only for external scripts (should only be used if the src attribute is present).

Note: There are several ways an external script can be executed:

If async is present: The script is executed asynchronously with the rest of the page (the script will be executed while the page continues the parsing) If async is not present and defer is present: The script is executed when the page has finished parsing If neither async or defer is present: The script is fetched and executed immediately, before the browser continues parsing the page

http://www.w3schools.com/tags/att_script_defer.asp

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document.onreadystatechange = function(){
     if(document.readyState === 'complete'){
         /*code here*/
     }
}

look here: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ie/ms536957(v=vs.85).aspx

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1  
one-line: document.onload = function() { ... } –  colminator Mar 26 at 17:31

Working Fiddle

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<head>
<script>
function myFunction()
{
   alert("Page is loaded");
}
</script>
</head>

<body onload="myFunction()">
<h1>Hello World!</h1>
</body>    
</html>
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As Daniel says, you could use document.onload.

The various javascript frameworks hwoever (jQuery, Mootools, etc.) use a custom event 'domready', which I guess must be more effective. If you're developing with javascript, I'd highly recommend exploiting a framework, they massively increase your productivity.

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Pity browsers didn't do what frameworks do. –  Jarvis Apr 30 '09 at 16:54

If you are using jQuery,

$(function() {...});

is equivalent to

$(document).ready(function () { })

See What event does JQuery $function() fire on?

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1  
Why is this marked down 0_o –  gerdi Jan 17 '14 at 13:13

My advise use asnyc attribute for script tag thats help you to load the external scripts after page load

<script type="text/javascript" src="a.js" async></script>
<script type="text/javascript" src="b.js" async></script>
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According to w3schools, If async is present: The script is executed asynchronously with the rest of the page (the script will be executed while the page continues the parsing). Perhaps you meant defer instead, like @Daniel Price mentioned? –  jk7 Apr 15 at 0:06

I find sometimes on more complex pages that not all the elements have loaded by the time window.onload is fired. If that's the case, add setTimeout before your function to delay is a moment. It's not elegant but it's a simple hack that renders well.

window.onload = function(){ doSomethingCool(); };

becomes...

window.onload = function(){ setTimeout( function(){ doSomethingCool(); }, 1000); };
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jQuery wrappers that for you. You'll probably find it to be the easiest solution.

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//It's tested and working :)

$(document).ready(function() { functon1(); function2() });

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