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I have a inline function defined as following:

inline string Change(char *pointer) {
    string str;
    char temp[32] = "";

    sprintf(temp,"%c:%c:%c:%c:%c:%c", //line 1
        temp[0],temp[1],temp[2],
        temp[3],temp[4],temp[5],
    );

    str = temp;
    return str;
}

when I use memory leak tool to check it, it indicates line 1(marked above) is memory leak. What is the problem of the above code?

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There's no leak but it doesn't compiler either. I'll fix it now. –  Peter G. Nov 10 '11 at 12:07
    
I cannot reproduce that. Can you post a complete, minimal example? –  Kerrek SB Nov 10 '11 at 12:08
    
Maybe it does not like the single quote at the end of the first line. –  waffleman Nov 10 '11 at 12:08
2  
what is the argument 'pointer' used for? did you intend to use in the sprintf statement? pointer[0]... ? –  Claptrap Nov 10 '11 at 12:09
1  
@sharptooth: That's questionable. For starters, there's no explicit dynamic allocation in the code, so it's hard to imagine how a leak could come about in the first place. –  Kerrek SB Nov 10 '11 at 12:11
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6 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I created fully compilable example:

#include <string>
#include <iostream>
#include <cstdio>

std::string Change( char * ) {
    std::string str;
    char temp[32] = "";

    sprintf(temp,"%c:%c:%c:%c:%c:%c", //line 1
        temp[0],temp[1],temp[2],
        temp[3],temp[4],temp[5]
    );

    str = temp;
    return str;
}

int main()
{
    char a[]={"abaaaaa2"};
    std::cout<<Change(a)<<std::endl;
}

When running under valgrind, I get no leaks detected:

==16829== 
==16829== HEAP SUMMARY:
==16829==     in use at exit: 0 bytes in 0 blocks
==16829==   total heap usage: 0 allocs, 0 frees, 0 bytes allocated
==16829== 
==16829== All heap blocks were freed -- no leaks are possible
==16829== 
==16829== For counts of detected and suppressed errors, rerun with: -v
==16829== ERROR SUMMARY: 0 errors from 0 contexts (suppressed: 15 from 8)
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If you want to know exactly where is the leak you can use plugins. you can pick out a plugin that will be convenient for you. For me, it is deleaker. There are so many developments in this field!!

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2  
+1 great app. i also use it. –  z0r1fan Dec 19 '11 at 17:39
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If you want to know exactly where is the leak you can use plugins. you can pick out a plugin >that will be convenient for you. For me, it is deleaker. There are so many developments in >this field!!

Thank. It helped me.

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The code above alone is leak-free. The tool might indicate a leak in either of the two cases:

  1. the string returned from teh function is assigned to another string variable somewhere and that other variable is not destroyed before the tool is run - then technically the string body is still allocated at that point and the tool reports it
  2. the string body allocator cached the string body block for future reuse and the tool is run before the allocator releases all cached blocks - then again technically the string body is allocated and the tool reports it.
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The tool is malfunctioning; there's no memory leak there.

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Memory leak only occurs when you acquire free store memory using new or new [] and do not release it back by calling delete or delete[] respectively.

std::string does internally allocate on freestore but you are returning it as return type, And that is not leaking memory.

The code you showed does not use new or new [] so there is no memory leak in the code you show.
The tool you use seems to be misleading. or ou need to show us your real code to get an better answer.

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