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I'm developing a network application for both Windows XP and Seven. The application receives data via UDP and uses blocking sockets, select (not WSAPoll) and recv functions.

For testing I'm using two identical notebooks with different OS installed: Dell Latitude D630, Core 2 Duo 2.2GHz, 4Gb RAM, Broadcom NetXtreme 57xx Gigabit Controller. I've got the following results:

Windows XP Professional 32bit: The network monitor application shows that the network interface receives data from LAN with average speed 35 MBytes/s. The application receives data from a socket with average speed 30 MBytes/s and detects 13% losses.

Windows 7 Enterprise 32bit: The network monitor application shows that the network interface receives data from LAN with average speed 35 MBytes/s. The application receives data from a socket with average speed 10 MBytes/s and detects 65% losses.

It looks like the application doesn't have enough time to receive all the packets from a socket on Windows 7. But why the result is different from Win XP?

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Different hardware driver, MMCSS throttles network activity on 7, other. I'd check if increasing receive buffer would reasonably lower loss rate in both systems. –  Roman R. Nov 10 '11 at 12:48
    
My receiving buffer is set to 64K via setsockopt after socket creation. Thanks for the answer. I will check your assupmtions. –  Roman Nov 10 '11 at 13:17
    
Yes, increasing the buffer size made receiving more stable. The reason the results were different is receive buffer size on Windows 7 should be bigger than on Win XP. I've increased the size to 256KBytes and got receiving speed 35MBps with 3% loss for both. Thank you. –  Roman Nov 10 '11 at 15:16

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