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I was playing with some ruby the other day and I wrote the following code

 File.open(my_file, "w+") do | fh | 
     begin
       fh.readonly = true               <--------Exception thrown here
     ensure
       fh.close
     end
  end

this does not work as it throws EACCES because the file is readonly, if I change the open flag to "r" this works just fine. To me this is counter intuitive because I thought opening it with "r" meant i'd only be able to read the file, not change attributes.

I am using win32-file (0.6.6) with ruby 1.8.7 (not upgradable for current project), is this normal behaviour a quirk of the win-32 file gem or just a bug that I am able to code around.

In order to set the readonly bit to true I must open with w+ which seems much more sensible

A bit more info is that this test was performed on Windows Server 2003 64-bit, just in case that makes a diff.

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EACCES is thrown on trying to open the file with "w+" or on setting readonly to true? –  hellectronic Nov 10 '11 at 18:13
    
When setting readonly to true, sorry I should have been more clear –  krystan honour Nov 11 '11 at 9:55

2 Answers 2

Try opening the file with read and write permissions.

File.open(my_file, "rw+") do | fh | 
 begin
   fh.readonly = true
 ensure
   fh.close
 end
end
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1  
nope, illegal access mode rw+ (ArgumentError) –  krystan honour Nov 11 '11 at 16:27
up vote 0 down vote accepted

I eventually found out what this was, there was another process locking the directory with an exclusive lock on the filesystem, It didn't show up with processexplorer but i noticed in my log something logging that directory, I stopped the service and bam it worked.

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