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I have following code for creating a graph structure using adjacent list

#include<iostream>
#include<algorithm>
#include<string.h>
#include<math.h>
#include<iostream>
using namespace std;
#define MAX 1000

typedef struct {
    int y;
    int weight;
    struct edgenode *next;
    }edgenode;

typedef struct
{
    edgenode* edges[MAX+1];
    int degree[MAX+1];
    int nvertices;
    int ndegrees;
    int nedges;
    bool directed;
    }graph;

void initialize(graph *g,bool directed){
    int i;
    g->nvertices=0;
    g->nedges=0;
    g->directed=directed;
    for(i=1;i<=MAX;i++)g->degree[i]=0;
    for(i=1;i<=MAX;i++)g->edges[i]=NULL;
}

void insert(graph *g,int x,int y,bool directed){
    edgenode *p;
    p=malloc(sizeof(edgenode));
}

int main(){
    return 0;
}

When I try to compile it, I get the following error:

1>------ Build started: Project: graph_list, Configuration: Debug Win32 ------
1>  graph_list.cpp
1>c:\users\dato\documents\visual studio 2010\projects\graph_list\graph_list\graph_list.cpp(12): error C2371: 'edgenode' : redefinition; different basic types
1>          c:\users\dato\documents\visual studio 2010\projects\graph_list\graph_list\graph_list.cpp(11) : see declaration of 'edgenode'
1>c:\users\dato\documents\visual studio 2010\projects\graph_list\graph_list\graph_list.cpp(35): 

error C2027: use of undefined type 'edgenode'
1>          c:\users\dato\documents\visual studio 2010\projects\graph_list\graph_list\graph_list.cpp(11) : see declaration of 'edgenode'
1>c:\users\dato\documents\visual studio 2010\projects\graph_list\graph_list\graph_list.cpp(35): error C2440: '=' : cannot convert from 'void *' to 'edgenode *'
1>          Conversion from 'void*' to pointer to non-'void' requires an explicit cast
========== Build: 0 succeeded, 1 failed, 0 up-to-date, 0 skipped ==========

What am I doing wrong and how can I fix it?

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closed as not a real question by Soner Gönül, BЈовић, Daniel Mošmondor, ereOn, John Humphreys - w00te Nov 10 '11 at 14:16

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
is it main problem? –  dato datuashvili Nov 10 '11 at 13:32
3  
The main problem is that you're not really writing C++, but some Frankensteinian syntax soup seasoned with heaps of hope. Yes, perhaps you might be able to make this work, but I would hesitate to call the result a success in learning C++. –  Kerrek SB Nov 10 '11 at 13:33
    
i am not learning c++ from this code,i think it is clear yes?i have asked question about graph theory and not about c++ –  dato datuashvili Nov 10 '11 at 13:35
5  
I think it is clear from this code that you should be learning C++, if you intend to program in it. The question is about a compile-time error. That means it's a question about C++, not about graph theory. –  svick Nov 10 '11 at 13:37
    
@KerrekSB: I think the main problem is trying to write C using a C++ compiler. –  Mike Seymour Nov 10 '11 at 13:43

2 Answers 2

In C++, you have to cast the result of malloc() to the correct type:

p = (edgenode*)malloc(sizeof(edgenode));

Also, you shouldn't use typedef, certainly not the way you do:

struct edgenode {
    int y;
    int weight;
    struct edgenode *next;
};

Your code looks like a weird combination of C and C++. There's nothing stopping you from doing that, but it's probably a bad idea. You should decide whether you want to write in C or C++.

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ok it is clear i know,but i am trying to learn it from book,so i use it as it is in book –  dato datuashvili Nov 10 '11 at 13:36
    
Are you sure the book is specifically about C++? If not, then you need to be extra careful. (If yes, you should probably throw it out.) –  Kerrek SB Nov 10 '11 at 13:39
3  
@dato, then either that book is horrible or you're mixing it with other things you learned, which makes it into this mess. –  svick Nov 10 '11 at 13:40

Your use of edgenode is inconsistent:

typedef struct {
    int y;
    int weight;
    struct edgenode *next;
} edgenode;

In the declaration of next you use the type struct edgenode, but the struct you are declaring is an anonymous struct that gets typedef'ed to the name edgenode. To be able to refer to the struct as struct edgenode, you have to add that name to the declaration:

typedef struct edgenode {
   ...
} edgenode;

The second error is because you can't implicitly convert void* to other pointer types in C++, you have to explicitly cast the result of malloc or use the C++ new instead.

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