Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is this a good case to use enmus? Or would it be better to use an array? The values here wouldn't change maybe say once a year.

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;

namespace ConsoleApplication1
{

public enum transmission
{
    Manual,
    NonSynchronous,
    Automatic,
    SemiAutomatic,
    Continuously,
    Infinitely,
    Electric,
    Hydrostatic,
    Hydrodynamic,
}

public enum bodystyle
{
    Convertable,
    Hatchback,
    Sports,
    Sedan
}
public enum carcolors
{
    Red,
    Blue,
    Yellow,
    White,
    Black,
    Green
}
public enum fueltype
{   
    Biofuels,
    FossilFuels,
    Nuclear,
    Fission,
    Fusion
}

public class Car
{
       public Car(String cName, double cMaxSpeed, String cTransmission, String cBodystyle, String cColors, String cFueltype) {
         carname = cName;
         transmission = cTransmission;
         bodystyle = cBodystyle;
         colors = cColors;
         fueltype = cFueltype;
         maxspeed = cMaxSpeed;
     }
     public string carname
     {
         get;
         set;
     }
     public string transmission
     {
         get;
         private set;
     }
     public string bodystyle
     {
         get;
         private set;
     }
     public string colors
     {
         get;
         private set;
     }
     public string fueltype
     {
         get;
         private set;
     }

     public void carInfo()
     {
         Console.WriteLine("------------------------------------");
         Console.WriteLine("Car Name:         " + this.carname);
         Console.WriteLine("Car Transmission: " + this.transmission );
         Console.WriteLine("Car Bodystyle:    " + this.bodystyle);
         Console.WriteLine("Car Colors:       " + this.colors);
         Console.WriteLine("Car Fueltype:     " + this.fueltype);
         Console.WriteLine("Car MaxSpeed:     " + this.maxspeed);
         Console.WriteLine("------------------------------------");

     }


}

public class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Car nissan = new Car("Lamborgini", 255, Convert.ToString(transmission.Automatic), Convert.ToString(bodystyle.Sports), Convert.ToString(carcolors.Red), Convert.ToString(fueltype.Biofuels));
        nissan.carInfo();
    }
}

}
share|improve this question
    
It would help improve the quality of the answers if you made your title match your question content. The title asks if this is correct usage, which it isn't, the question asks if this is the best course of action vs lookup list, which is debatable. –  Adam Houldsworth Nov 10 '11 at 14:42

8 Answers 8

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You have defined several Enum types, but are not actually using them. So, in this respect, not a proper usage.

In regards to using an array - I don't see the value of that over enums.

The types you are passing in are all string, rather than the Enum types as are the types of your properties.

A proper usage would look like:

public enum BodyStyle
{
    Convertable,
    Hatchback,
    Sports,
    Sedan
}

public class Car
{
  public Car(String cName, BodyStyle cBodyStyle)
  {
     carname = cName;
     this.BodyStyle = cBodyStyle;
  }


     public string carname
     {
         get;
         set;
     }

     public BodyStyle BodyStyle
     {
         get;
         private set;
     }
}
share|improve this answer
2  
Shouldn't this be a comment? –  Paul Jackson Nov 10 '11 at 14:30
    
@PaulJackson: Why would this be a comment? It's a short answer, but it's correct. –  James Johnson Nov 10 '11 at 14:32
    
@JamesJohnson It's not an answer, it's an observation. –  Adam Houldsworth Nov 10 '11 at 14:34
1  
@Downvoter - care to comment? –  Oded Nov 10 '11 at 14:37
    
@Oded I don't think it answers the question as to whether in this instance his choice of enum over a lookup list is a good one. Although you are correct, I believe it detracts from the main question. –  Adam Houldsworth Nov 10 '11 at 14:38

The issue will be, in order to change them would require a recompile. What else does this application tie into? Could these values be stored in a database ? That would make updating it much simpler, and you could do it without recompiling the application.

share|improve this answer
1  
For another perspective, thedailywtf.com/Articles/Soft_Coding.aspx –  dsolimano Nov 10 '11 at 14:34
    
I think I've read that article, if it's the one I'm thinking of. "Soft coding hell". It's true, you can ruin a perfectly readable program by spreading out data definitions all over the place. But sometimes compiling code and deploying into a prod environment can be troublesome, when a quick update to a DB, or config file, would be simpler. –  kevingreen Nov 10 '11 at 15:36
    
Indeed. But on the flip side, I've messed up many a prod environment with a quick update to a DB when I didn't take it with the same seriousness and QA as a code release. –  dsolimano Nov 10 '11 at 15:38

The problem is when they change you are going to have to modify, compile, test and release your code. I would suggest if something is likely to change then store it somewhere it can be configured at runtime e.g a database or config file.

share|improve this answer

No, I would declare the properties with the enums they should represent like this:

 public transmission transmission { get; private set; } 
share|improve this answer

It doesn't look like you're using the enumerations in your code. The property types should correspond to the enums you've created:

public bodystyle BodyStyle { get; set; }
share|improve this answer

The enums you have listed are really more suited as data and loaded as such (into arrays, dictionaries etc).

The advantage of enums is that they are actually numeric values so if you needed to do explicit testing against any of the values you should look at using TT templating to generate enums from your data.

Basically if they are not used (ie. value tested) programatically then they are probably not really enums :)

share|improve this answer

I don't think so.

You are working against what an Enum is. I think of an Enum as a family of integer constants; you are using it as an object that just happens to convert to a particular string.

share|improve this answer

I don't understand why you declare enums while only using the string component of them. In this situation, you might as well use arrays of strings.

If you do want to use enums (and yes this situation is suitable), you could do:

public Car(String cName, double cMaxSpeed, transmission cTransmission, bodystyle cBodystyle, carcolors cColors, fueltype cFueltype) {
         carname = cName;
         transmission = cTransmission;
         bodystyle = cBodystyle;
         colors = cColors;
         fueltype = cFueltype;
         maxspeed = cMaxSpeed;
     }

     public transmission transmission
     {
         get;
         private set;
     }
     public bodystyle bodystyle
     {
         get;
         private set;
     }
     public carcolors colors
     {
         get;
         private set;
     }
     public fueltype fueltype
     {
         get;
         private set;
     }

Not the complete change of your code but I think you'll get the idea. There is no point in declaring enums if you only end up converting them to strings. Keep the enums in the way they are. Pass them into the constructor and save them as the enum type you declared.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.