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I have the following...

IF CONDITION1  THEN

        -- SELECT  STATEMENT MIGHT RETURN DATA

         IF CONDITION2 THEN

                -- SELECT COUNT

             IF CONDITION3 THEN



                    INSERT INTO TABLE
                            (
                            --- 
                            )
                    VALUES  (
                            ---
                            );


            End IF;


    END IF;


 END IF;


EXCEPTION
   WHEN NO_DATA_FOUND THEN
 RETURN;

END of Trigger

Is this a correct way of handling exception for select statement inside CONDITION1?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

PL/SQL has no way to return to the site of the error, so you need to create a block around the portion you want to ignore specific errors:

IF CONDITION1  THEN
         BEGIN
         -- SELECT  STATEMENT MIGHT RETURN DATA
         EXCEPTION
             WHEN NO_DATA_FOUND THEN
                 NULL;
         END;
         IF CONDITION2 THEN
                -- SELECT COUNT
             IF CONDITION3 THEN
                    INSERT INTO TABLE
                            (
                            --- 
                            )
                    VALUES  (
                            ---
                            );
            End IF;
    END IF;
 END IF;
END TRIGGER_NAME;

An alternative is to use an explicit cursor, which does not return an error when it is empty:

DECLARE
   CURSOR cur_sample is select dummy from dual where 1=0;
   v_dummy dual.dummy%type;
BEGIN
   IF CONDITION1  THEN
         open cur_sample;
         fetch cur_sample into v_dummy;
         close cur_sample;
         IF CONDITION2 THEN
                -- SELECT COUNT
             IF CONDITION3 THEN
                    INSERT INTO TABLE
                            (
                            --- 
                            )
                    VALUES  (
                            ---
                            );
            End IF;
       END IF;
    END IF;
END;
share|improve this answer
    
plus 1 for how to do an empty error handler in pl.sql - null; –  Jonny Leeds Dec 11 '13 at 12:48

Depends what you mean by "correct". What you have presented is syntactically valid, yes. But you haven't told us what you actually want to happen so we can't tell you whether the code you posted will actually do what you want.

From a business logic standpoint, are you certain that it really is not an error if your SELECT INTO returns 0 rows? If you are catching and swallowing an exception, that means that you know that it's not really an error. If you're coding a SELECT INTO, however, that implies that you expect exactly one row. It's certainly possible that both of these statements are true but it would be more common that it really is an exception and that it shouldn't simply be swallowed and ignored.

In general, I would prefer to put the exception handler as close as possible to the query that might throw the exception as possible. I would find it cleaner to have something like

IF condition1
THEN
  BEGIN
    <<select statement>>
  EXCEPTION
    WHEN no_data_found
    THEN
      <<do something>>
  END;

  IF condition2
  THEN
    ...
  END IF;
END IF;

That way, if you end up with multiple places in your procedure where a NO_DATA_FOUND exception might be thrown, it will be clear which exceptions are expected and which are unexpected.

When you get to the point of having three layers of nested IF statements, I would tend to suspect that you want to refactor the code into multiple procedures to make the code clearer. For example, rather than having a nested PL/SQL block that executes the SELECT statement, catches the exception, and handles the exception, it would probably be clearer to have a separate function that did all that and then call that function from your trigger.

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Take another look at the OP's code. That return certainly won't work... –  Allan Nov 10 '11 at 15:45
    
@Allan - Why not? It is syntactically valid to return from a PL/SQL block in an exception handler. That may not be the correct behavior but it's valid syntax SQL> create table t( col1 number ); Table created. SQL> create trigger trg_t 2 before insert on t 3 for each row 4 declare 5 l_emp_rec emp%rowtype; 6 begin 7 select * 8 into l_emp_rec 9 from emp 10 where empno = :new.col1; 11 exception 12 when no_data_found 13 then 14 return; 15 end; 16 / Trigger created. SQL> insert into t values( 1 ); 1 row created. –  Justin Cave Nov 10 '11 at 15:49
    
You're right (of course). I was totally unaware of that command (outside of functions). I still think the behavior will not be what OP expected, which I believe was resumption of execution from the site of the error. –  Allan Nov 10 '11 at 15:56
    
@Allan - I agree that it's entirely possible that the behavior isn't what kalls actually wants. It's hard to know without a better explanation of what kalls wants to happen. –  Justin Cave Nov 10 '11 at 16:03
1  
@kalls - That is what your code does. There are better ways of coding it (which I discuss above) but the code you posted appears to meet that requirement. –  Justin Cave Nov 10 '11 at 18:51

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