Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have this code up on my server here (Yes I known ASMX is a bad idea but WCF doesn't work at all for some reason):

<%@ WebService Language="C#" Class="Test" %>

using System.Web;
using System.Web.Services;

[WebService(Namespace = "http://smplsite.com/smplAccess")]
[WebServiceBinding(ConformsTo = WsiProfiles.BasicProfile1_1)]
public class Test : System.Web.Services.WebService
{
    State s;

    public Test()
    {
        s = (Session["foo"] ?? (Session["foo"] = new State())) as State ;
    }

    [WebMethod(EnableSession = true)]
    public void Set(int j) { i=j; }

    [WebMethod(EnableSession = true)]
    public int Get() { return i; }
}

class State
{
    public int i = 5;
}

when I run the folloing code:

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var ser = new ServiceReference1.TestSoapClient();

        Console.WriteLine(ser.Get());
        ser.Set(3);
        Console.WriteLine(ser.Get());
    }
}

I expect to get back:

5
3

but I got back

5
5

My Solution

  1. Usee wsdl.exe to generate a proxy class
  2. Add references as needed to get it to compile
  3. Use Martin's solution


This Seems related

Edit: Added State object.

share|improve this question
    
I would strongly suggest you try to get a WCF "Hello, world" service working, then try to figure out why your WCF version of this "didn't work at all". This would be a bad reason to stick yourself with ASMX. –  John Saunders Apr 30 '09 at 18:56
    
@John: WCF hello world works on my system. Trying the same code on my server fails and talks with tech support indicated that WCF is officially disallowed. –  BCS Apr 30 '09 at 20:23

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Web services are stateless, so they do not store their state between multiple calls. Everytime you call a method, a new instance of the service will be created and its members will have the default values again.

What you can do, is to enable session state (as you have done) and store your state in the ASP.NET session.

Something like this:

[WebMethod(EnableSession = true)]
public void Set(int j) { Session["i"] = j; }

[WebMethod(EnableSession = true)]
public int Get() { return Session["i"] == null ? 5 : (int)Session["i"]; }

This was what is required on the server side. But you also have to take care on the client side:

Since an ASP.NET session is identified by a cookie, you have to make sure that you are passing the same cookie to the server with every web method call. To do so, you have to instantiate a CookieContainer and assign it to the web service proxy instance:

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    var ser = new ServiceReference1.TestSoapClient();
    ser.CookieContainer = new System.Net.CookieContainer();
    // ...
}
share|improve this answer
    
there is no CookieContainer on the type... Hmm. –  BCS Apr 30 '09 at 18:01
1  
this looks related :b webservices20.blogspot.com/2008/10/… –  BCS Apr 30 '09 at 18:18
    
If you add a "Web Reference", then you should see the CookieContainer property. –  M4N Apr 30 '09 at 18:28
    
trying to add a web reference just hangs at step 4 from the above blog. It just sits there forever with the "waiting" bar running. –  BCS Apr 30 '09 at 18:39
    
I got around this by using WSDL.exe and adding a few System.Web.* references. –  BCS Apr 30 '09 at 18:49

You need to turn on sessions.

[WebMethod(EnableSession = true)]
share|improve this answer
    
No joy. –  BCS Apr 30 '09 at 17:46
    
Check configuration/system.web/sessionState in your web.config for the asmx. It can override session on your web method if it is turned to "off". –  JP Alioto Apr 30 '09 at 17:50
    
I don't even have a web.config –  BCS Apr 30 '09 at 18:04

It looks to me like its not persisting class state between session method calls - probably a new object is being called each time. I'm actually not sure that you can rely on getting the same object instance each time you call the service. Joshua's answer is correct, but you'll also need to write code to persist your service's internal field into that session.

share|improve this answer
    
link ? –  BCS Apr 30 '09 at 17:49
    
@John: You can rely on never getting the same instance twice. You get a new instance for each request! –  John Saunders Apr 30 '09 at 18:55
    
@John Yeah, that's what I figured. I was way, way to lazy to go check and thus wanted to hedge my bet a litte. :) –  John Christensen Apr 30 '09 at 20:05

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.