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I have three models, simplified for the example:

class Customer(models.Model):
    email = models.CharField(max_length=128)

class Order(models.Model):
    customer = models.ForeignKey(Customer)
    order_status = models.CharField(blank=True, max_length=256)

class Lineitem(models.Model):
    order = models.ForeignKey(Order)
    quantity = models.IntegerField(blank=True)
    price = models.DecimalField(max_digits=6, decimal_places=2)

I want to query the customers (possibly with a filter) and annotate the total they have spent (that is, the sum over (price * quantity)

I have tried:
Customer.objects.filter(something).annotate(total_spent=Sum(F('order__lineitem__quantity') * F('order__lineitem__price')))

It would appear that Sum() cannot be used with F() expressions. Is there another way to do this?

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Did you ever get this to work? –  dotty Jun 1 '10 at 15:03
    
I'm looking for a solution too –  Don Jun 10 '11 at 15:37

4 Answers 4

Have you looked at using the .extra() method?

See the Django QuerySet API.

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3  
I have. It works, but I'm trying to avoid it for two reasons: First, it uses a per-row subquery instead of a join, which may scale badly for some database backends. Second, it doesn't work with filter() on the extra field, so it can't be combined procedurally with other Q objects –  Sam Apr 30 '09 at 19:12

You'll probably need to roll out your own custom aggregator. You can find a simple walk through of a GROUP_CONCAT example that should get you started here: http://harkablog.com/inside-the-django-orm-aggregates.html

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You could try using a property in the LineItem model:

class Lineitem(models.Model):
    order = models.ForeignKey(Order)
    quantity = models.IntegerField(blank=True)
    price = models.DecimalField(max_digits=6, decimal_places=2)
    def _get_total(self):
        return quantity * price
    total = property(_get_total)

Then I think you can annotate with the total amount spent using

Customer.objects.filter(something).annotate(total_spent=Sum('order__lineitem__total'))

I don't know how the efficiency of this method relates to others, but it is more Pythonic/Django-y than the alternative, which is to write the entire SQL query by hand as in

Customer.objects.raw("SELECT ... from <customer_table_name> where ...")
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I have tried this and it isn't working, I'm getting the Cannot resolve keyword into field error. :-( –  Berislav Lopac May 19 '12 at 8:18
    
OK, from the comment on the other answer it looks like this cannot be done with annotate on a property. –  murgatroid99 May 19 '12 at 20:43
    
The Django ORM generates queries that perform calculations through SQL, and therefore, it's not possible to include Python-defined properties in methods as part of a query. You can apply a list-comprehension post-query, but this isn't the same thing, as Justin Hamade noted. –  acjay Nov 23 '12 at 14:47

I just ran into this and I don't think that annotate and will work with a property, see Django - Can you use property as the field in an aggregation function?

Here is what I did.

class Customer(models.Model):
    email = models.CharField(max_length=128)

class Order(models.Model):
    customer = models.ForeignKey(Customer)
    order_status = models.CharField(blank=True, max_length=256)

class Lineitem(models.Model):
    order = models.ForeignKey(Order)
    quantity = models.IntegerField(blank=True)
    price = models.DecimalField(max_digits=6, decimal_places=2)
    @property
    def total(self):
        return self.quantity * self.price

Then use sum and a list comprehension:

sum([li.total for li in  LineItem.objects.filter(order__customer=some_customer).filter(somefilter)])
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that does not work because properties are calculated after the query –  toto_tico May 15 '12 at 15:28
    
This option works but you are doing the sum in python not sql which means it will be a lot slower as it gets big. –  Jorge Vargas May 30 '12 at 16:49
    
Does this method update as you add more orders? –  agconti Aug 22 '13 at 15:41

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