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int func(int x){return x;}
...
std::function<int(int)> x = std::bind(func, std::placeholders::_1);
x(123);
  1. Does x(123) actually call the operator() of the functor which std::function generated which in turn calls the operator() of the functor which std::bind generated which finally calls func? Does this get optimized into something as optimal as calling func(123)?
  2. Where does the functor live which std::bind generates? In what scope? And how does std::bind name it? (can there be name collisions)
  3. Can lambdas replace all uses of std::bind?
  4. Is std::bind as optimal as implementing it as a lambda instead?
  5. What's up with the syntax of the template argument of std::function? How does that get parsed and how can I use that template argument syntax elsewhere?
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2  
For 2. you might be interested in artima.com/cppsource/type_erasure.html –  Flexo Nov 10 '11 at 16:29
4  
One question at a time, please. Each SO post is a question. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Nov 10 '11 at 16:38
    
This is more of a set of questions than a concrete question, and they range from syntax (for the argument of function<>) to behavior (where does the result of bind live? can lambda substitute them?) performance (will it be optimized?) –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Nov 10 '11 at 16:46
    
For 1. Unfortunately as far as I remember(seeing generated code by VS2012 - release) it does not compare at all with x(123) call. For example, it's not in-lined. If you use a lambda you have inlineing. –  Ghita Jan 9 '13 at 18:03

3 Answers 3

up vote 14 down vote accepted

Does x(123) actually call the operator() of the functor which std::function generated which in turn calls the operator() of the functor which std::bind generated which finally calls func? Does this get optimized into something as optimal as calling func(123)?

I wouldn't describe the operator() of std::function as 'generated' (it's a regular member), but otherwise that is a good description. Optimizations are up to your compiler, but be warned that to optimize the indirection of std::function (which requires the use of type erasure) a compiler may need to perform heroics.

Where does the functor live which std::bind generates? In what scope? And how does std::bind name it? (can there be name collisions)

The call to std::bind returns a functor of unspecified type, and a copy of that functor is stored inside the x object. This copy will live as long as x itself. There is no name involved so I'm not sure what you mean by that.

Can lambdas replace all uses of std::bind?

No. Consider auto bound = std::bind(functor, _1); where functor is a type with an overloaded operator(), let's say on long and int. Then bound(0L) doesn't have the same effect as bound(0) and you can't replicate that with a lambda.

Is std::bind as optimal as implementing it as a lambda instead?

This is up to the compiler. Measure yourself.

What's up with the syntax of the template argument of std::function? How does that get parsed and how can I use that template argument syntax elsewhere?

It's a function type. Perhaps you're already familiar with the syntax for pointers/references to functions: void(*)(), int(&)(double). Then just remove the pointer/reference out of the type, and you just have a function type: void(), int(double). You can use those like so:

typedef int* function_type(long);
function_type* p; // pointer to function
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2  
+1 for the only correct answer to question #2: a functor is just an object, there is no magical class generation involved. –  Luc Touraille Nov 10 '11 at 16:41
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Nailed the static polymorphism (bind) vs. monomorhic prototypes (function<>) difference the first time round :) Quite a profound but easily overlooked difference indeed. (You had my +1 from the start) –  sehe Nov 10 '11 at 22:44
    
+1 for the use case of bind that cannot be replicated with lambda. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Nov 10 '11 at 23:05

1 . Does x(123) actually call the operator() of the functor which std::function generated which in turn calls the operator() of the functor which std::bind generated which finally calls func? Does this get optimized into something as optimal as calling func(123)?

If you have optimizations enabled, the 'stuff' gets inlined and you can count on this being as optimal as calling func(123).

2 . Where does the functor live which std::bind generates? In what scope? And how does std::bind name it? (can there be name collisions)

Precising: bind generates a 'fleeting', implementation defined, bind expression, that is assignable to function<>. Function is just a class template (Thanks, Luc T.). And it lives in the standard library. However, the bind expressions are implementation defined.

The standard library does come with traits (std::is_bind_expression<>) to allow MPL detection of such expressions. One decisive feature of bind expressions over std::function is that they are (what I'd call) deferred callable objects (i.e. that they retain full call site semantics including the ability to select overloads at the actual application site). std::function<>, on the other hand, commits to a single prototype and internally stores the callable object by type erasure (think variant or any).

3 . Can lambdas replace all uses of std::bind?

4 . Is std::bind as optimal as implementing it as a lambda instead?

AFAICT lambdas should compile down to about the same as the bind expressions. One thing that I think lambdas can't do that bind expressions can is nested bind expressions Edit While the specific idiom of nested bind expressions is not replicatable using lambdas, lambdas are of course able to express (nearly) the same much more naturally:

 bind(f, bind(g, _1))(x); 
 // vs.
 [](int x) { f(g(x)); };

 

5 . What's up with the syntax of the template argument of std::function? How does that get parsed and how can I use that template argument syntax elsewhere?

It is just a function signature (the type of a function), being passed as template parameter.

You can also use it as a function parameter type, which degrades to a function pointer(similar to how array by-value parameters degrade to pointers, Thanks David!). In practice, most anywhere, as long as you don't have a need to name a variable/type:

 void receiveFunction(void(int, double)); // spunky 'function<>'-style syntax

 void sample(int, double) { } 

 int main()
 { 
     receiveFunction(sample);
 }

 void receiveFunction(void (*f)(int, double)) // boring 'old' style syntax
 //                   void ( f)(int, double)  // ... also ok
 {
     // ..
 }
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Assuming f and g are not overloaded, then the nested bind expression can be expressed as a lambda: [](T t) { return f(g(t)); }. –  Luc Danton Nov 10 '11 at 16:35
    
@LucDanton: found the info in your answer. +1 for that –  sehe Nov 10 '11 at 16:40
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I disagree on point 2: the correct answer is that there is no functor "generated" by bind, just a temporary object returned by a function, which has no name and will live for the time of the expression it appears in (like all temporaries). This temporary is used to initialize x. –  Luc Touraille Nov 10 '11 at 16:44
1  
on the lambdas not being able to emulate nested bind expressions, they can do it and quite trivially. For your particular example: []( int x ) { f(g(x)); } which is actually more readable... –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Nov 10 '11 at 16:53
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Re: point 1, "If you have optimizations enabled, the 'stuff' gets inlined and you can count on this being as optimal as calling func(123)." I entirely disagree -- std::function<> uses type-erasure internally, and inlining cannot occur through type erasure. I.e., invoking a bind expression directly can be trivially inlined, but invoking a std::function<> can never inline the original function/functor. Re: nested bind expressions, I think that behavior is specific to boost::bind and doesn't apply to std::bind, but I'm not positive. –  ildjarn Nov 10 '11 at 19:32

Can lambdas replace all uses of std::bind?

C++14 will allow lambdas to mostly replace bind. Responding in particular to Luc Danton's answer, in C++14, you can write templated lambdas using auto such that bound(0) and bound(0L) behave differently.

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