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Any ideas on how to refactor the following:

 private string GetErrorText(ErrorType type, int error, string id)
 {
     string errorMessage = string.Empty;

     switch (type)
     {
         case ErrorType.Generic:
             switch (error)
             {
                 case (int)ErrorType.One:
                 errorMessage = string.Format("Generic Error {0}",id);
                 break;
                 case (int)ErrorType.Two:
                 errorMessage = "Generic Error 2.";
                 break;
             }
             break;
             case ErrorType.NonGeneric:
                    switch (error)
                    {
                        case (int)NonGenericError.One:
                            errorMessage = "One";
                            break;
                        case (int)NonGenericError.Two:
                            errorMessage = "Two";
                            break;
                        case (int)NonGenericError.Three:
                            errorMessage = "Three";
                            break;
                        case (int)NonGenericError.Four:
                            errorMessage = "Four"
                            break;
                    }
                    break;
            }
            return errorMessage;
        }

I know I can probably just return the string instead instead of using the break keyword. I heard that I can put this into a dictionary to completely avoid the switch. Also, can the switch statements be combined? And what happens in the even that I need to pass more than one argument to the string.Format method. Right now, it only takes one?

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Where is this called from and why does it have a Generic and NonGeneric purpose? –  Jodrell Nov 10 '11 at 16:45
    
What string.Format method? –  Jodrell Nov 10 '11 at 16:46
    
the switches have no default case –  Jodrell Nov 10 '11 at 16:48
    
I just added an example of the string.Format using the id parameter. This will set the error in a class. It is inherited code. –  Xaisoft Nov 10 '11 at 16:48
    
In the real system are the Non generic strings actually the same as the enum member names? –  Jodrell Nov 10 '11 at 17:09

3 Answers 3

A fairly common way to associate a string value with an enum is to use a custom attribute, and look it up at runtime with reflection. Here's a good explanation.

Of course, using reflection will be slower in practice than just using conditionals.

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One obvious observation is that the value of "type" doesn't matter - you can just have a single switch on "error".

string.Format takes as many arguments as needed, e.g.

errorMessage = string.Format("Generic Error {0}. Other data {1}. ", id, otherData);
share|improve this answer
    
Why does type not matter? It determines whether to go into the Generic switch or the NonGeneric switch. The actual switch statement has around 50+ cases. –  Xaisoft Nov 10 '11 at 16:58
    
In the example you gave, no decisions are made off of the value of type. Yes, you split into two sub-switches, but you might as well just have one since error is what controls the result. –  500 - Internal Server Error Nov 10 '11 at 17:06
    
Generic and NonGeneric are controlled by value of type, so I am slightly confused. –  Xaisoft Nov 10 '11 at 18:43

Why not?

string GetGenericErrorText(ErrorType error, string id)
{
   switch (error)              
   {
       case ErrorType.One:
           return string.Format("Generic Error {0}",id);

       default:
           return "Generic Error 2.";
    } 
}

and

string GetNonGenericErrorText(NonGenericError error)
{
   case NonGenericError.One:
       return "One";

   case NonGenericError.Two:
       reutrn "Two";

   case NonGenericError.Three: 
       return "Three";

   default: 
       return "Four";
}

EDIT

if the real code is a simple as the example you could do

string GetNonGenericErrorText(NonGenericError error)
{
    return error.ToString();
}
share|improve this answer
    
Well, this is good, but I was look at a way I could avoid the switch altogether. I have heard that using a lookup like a Dictionary is good practice, but not sure how to approach it. –  Xaisoft Nov 10 '11 at 17:02
    
Ok, but you would still need to build the dictionary somewhere. If you are building it from code why not just use a switch, equal burden, faster performance. –  Jodrell Nov 10 '11 at 17:08

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