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I iterate through an IEnumerable as the result of a Linq query using (ElementAt,Count) and (foreach). To my surprise, the performance difference is 25-30 fold! Why is that?

IEnumerable<double> result =
     ... simple Linq query that joins two tables
     ... returns about 600 items

double total = 0;

// Method 1: iterate with Count and ElementAt
for( int i = 0; i < result.Count(); i++ )
{
    total += result.ElementAt(i);
}

// Method 2: iterate with foreach
foreach( double value in result )
{
    total += value;
}
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Which way round is the difference (what's faster)? –  Murph Nov 10 '11 at 17:26
3  
Count() will iterate over the whole enumerable. Each ElementAt(n) will iterate to the nth element. foreach will iterate the whole enumerable once. I don't know all optimizations if the enumerable is also an IList or ICollection. –  ordag Nov 10 '11 at 17:30
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7 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The ElementAt() method is O(n), unless the actual concrete class that the IEnumerable represents optimizes it. That means that every time you call it, it has to loop through the entire Enumerable to find the element at n. Not to mention that since you have i < result.Count() in the condition part of your for loop, it's gotta loop through the entire enumerable every single time to get that count.

The second way, you loop through result exactly once.

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Since they say it's from a join, I'd guess that result.Count() is actually turned into a SQL COUNT(*). Hardly an improvement though! –  Jon Hanna Nov 10 '11 at 19:41
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Because ElementAt is iterating through the IEnumerable every time you call it. IEnumerables are not indexed so ElementAt must be implemented using GetEnumerator().

Why not do

total = result.Sum();
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... as is Count(). There's no need for the lambda expression, btw. Just result.Sum() should be fine. –  Jon Skeet Nov 10 '11 at 17:29
    
@Jon Skeet, suspected so but had to go and check first. Seems obvious now, ala Select() –  Jodrell Nov 10 '11 at 17:37
    
total += p; is for demostration purpose. The actual logic is different. –  Candy Chiu Nov 10 '11 at 17:40
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The performance difference is due to the fact the IEnumerable doesn't allow you to get by index, so every time you call ElementAt in your first loop it has to iterate through every item until it gets to the element you requested.

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Because each call iterates over the list. The simple solution is to call .ToList() before iterating, a better solution is to stop iterating.

var theList = result.ToList();

for( int i = 0; i < result.Count; i++ )
{
    total += result[i];
}

Better solution:

total = result.Sum();
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If i were to hazard a guess, the result.Count() call is non-deferred and actually hits the database whereas the foreach does not. If you flip the order you may get the opposite result. Also you could just do total = result.Sum();

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The first may be equivalent to:

double total = 0;

int i = 0;
while(true)
{
  int max = /*Database call to obtain COUNT(*) of join*/
  if(max > i)
    break;
  int j = 0;
  foreach(double value in result)
  {
    if(j++ == i)
    {
      total += value;
      break;
    }
  }
  ++i
}

Or it could even be equivalent to:

double total = 0;

int i = 0;
while(true)
{
  int max = 0;
  foreach(double value in result)
    ++max;
  if(max > i)
    break;
  int j = 0;
  foreach(double value in result)
  {
    if(j++ == i)
    {
      total += value;
      break;
    }
  }
  ++i
}

Or it could even requery to get result each time it appers in the code above.

On the other hand, Count() could be obtained by one property access, and ElementAt() could be O(1), if these are backed on structures that allow for such an optimisation, and such an optimisation was indeed available (e.g. it is for List<T>).

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This is all about understanding deferred execution! When a query is executed several times, then the time to run increases dramatically. LINQ can be quicker, but you really need to make a choice based on how you're going to use your query results.

Take a look at this article http://allthingscs.blogspot.com/2011/03/linq-performance.html. It analyzes that very issue .

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