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Is this case possible using javascript or jquery?

When the value of the select box with class "cl_preAction" is set to the option of '003' "End of World", the options in the select box "cl_prePRRS" 01,02,03 should be removed or grayed out (not possible to select - if this is possible)

Note that this pattern will repeat several times on a page, so using the same id will not work.

$('.cl_preAction').live('change', function (){  
     if ($(this).val() =='003'){
     $(this).parent().parent()...
});



<tr>
    <td>Action</td>
    <td class='none'>
       <div data-role='fieldcontain' class='none'>
        <select name='ACTC' class='none cl_preAction'   data-theme='a'>
            <option data-location='S' value='001'>Fire</option>
            <option data-location='T' value='002'>Flood</option>
            <option data-location='T' value='003'>End Of World</option>
        </select>
       </div>
    </td>
</tr>
<tr>
    <td>Reason</td>
    <td class='none'>
        <div data-role='fieldcontain' class='none'>
            <select name='PRRS' class='none cl_prePRRS'   data-theme='a'>
                <option value='01'>Rebuild</option>
                <option value='02'>Relocate</option>
                <option value='03'>Cash Payment</option>
                <option value='04'>Send registered letter indicating this event is not covered</option>
                    </select>
        </div>
    </td>
</tr>
share|improve this question
    
one thing to note here, if you're planning on using $(this) multiple times in the same scope so that it refers to the same object, it would be better to assign $(this) to a local variable. var me = $(this); and then use 'me' instead. –  kasdega Nov 10 '11 at 18:59
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3 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Your first issue will be that disabling select options doesn't work reliably across all browsers and versions. Your best bet is to remove the options you don't want but you could also create something that forces the user to select another option when required.

You're also going to have a problem with different rules for each of the select box pairings. Unless when you select option 3 in the 'control' select box it always blanks out options 1,2,3 of the target select box.

I would use a 'data' attribute...

    <select name='ACTC' class='none cl_preAction' data-theme='a' data-target-select="cl_prePRRS">

    $('.cl_preAction').live('change', function (){  
        var me = $(this);
        if (me.val() =='003') {
            $("."+me.attr("data-target-select")).filter(function() {
                return ($(this).val() != '03');  // I think you really want 04 here.
            }).remove();
        }
   });

Don't go down the road of trying to jump through the DOM unless you really have to. It's convoluted and heaven forbid you'd ever need to move a select box or change the page structure.

You'll notice that this solution will only remove the options that aren't = '03' in the target select box. You could easily add another "data" attribute that will allow you to pass in a list of options that should be kept and/or should be removed. You could do this by index of the options but that would be a little less flexible and harder to figure out.

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Will the linked selectors always be in adjacent tr elements? This is not an elegant way to do it, in that it depends heavily on your structure (if you add in a tr element between those containing the two selectors, this will fail)

$('.cl_preAction').live('change', function (){  
    if ($(this).val() =='003') {
        $(this).closest('tr').next('tr').find('.cl_prePRRS option').filter(function() {
            return (parseInt($(this).val(), 10) <= 3);
        }).remove();
    }
});

This will remove the options from the DOM.

share|improve this answer
    
I like that you added a disclaimer to your answer pointing out that if the HTML changes this may have problems. –  kasdega Nov 10 '11 at 18:57
    
I can't add a comment to your answer, so I'll write it here - that's a good method, but I think he may have multiple select lists with the same class (I believe he means the exact same fragment will repeat, which is why he can't use ids?) He will have to clarify this himself though. If that is the case, the data method won't work. –  Rahul Sekhar Nov 10 '11 at 19:09
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I'm pretty sure that disabling options will only work in IE 8 and greater. However, there are some interesting things you can try to overcome this in older versions.

That said, here's an example that answers the question as you asked it ;)

Essentially, it does the following

  • looks for the next tr tag
  • finds the select element in that node
  • declares disabled="disabled" if End of World is selected
  • if End of World is not selected, utilizes removeAttr() to re-enable the values
share|improve this answer
    
Disabling options works in FF (at least in 8.0) –  kasdega Nov 10 '11 at 20:36
    
Right, my meaning was that it doesn't work in IE < 8; of course it works in everything but ;) –  Kato Nov 13 '11 at 20:28
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