Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Given an array with N elements, I am looking for M (M < N) successive sub-arrays with equal lengths or with lengths that differ by mostly 1. For example, if N = 12 and M = 4, all sub-arrays would have equal lengths of N/M = 3. If N = 100 and M = 12, I expect sub-arrays with lengths 8 and 9, and both sizes should be uniformly spread within the original array. This simple task turned to be a little bit subtle to implement. I came up with an adaptation of the Bresenham's line algorithm, which looks like this when coded in C++:

/// The function suggests how an array with num_data-items can be
/// subdivided into successively arranged groups (intervals) with
/// equal or "similar" length. The number of intervals is specified
/// by the parameter num_intervals. The result is stored into an array
/// with (num_data + 1) items, each of which indicates the start-index of
/// an interval, the last additional index being a sentinel item which 
/// contains the value num_data.
///
/// Example:
///
///    Input:  num_data ........... 14,
///            num_intervals ...... 4
///
///    Result: result_start_idx ... [ 0, 3, 7, 10, 14 ]
///

void create_uniform_intervals( const size_t         num_data,
                               const size_t         num_intervals,
                               std::vector<size_t>& result_start_idx )
{
    const size_t avg_interval_len  = num_data / num_intervals;
    const size_t last_interval_len = num_data % num_intervals;

    // establish the new size of the result vector
    result_start_idx.resize( num_intervals + 1L );
    // write the pivot value at the end:
    result_start_idx[ num_intervals ] = num_data;

    size_t offset     = 0L; // current offset

    // use Bresenham's line algorithm to distribute
    // last_interval_len over num_intervals:
    intptr_t error = num_intervals / 2;

    for( size_t i = 0L; i < num_intervals; i++ )
    {
        result_start_idx[ i ] = offset;
        offset += avg_interval_len;
        error -= last_interval_len;
        if( error < 0 )
        {
            offset++;
            error += num_intervals;
        } // if
    } // for
}

This code calculates the interval lengths for N = 100, M=12: 8 9 8 8 9 8 8 9 8 8 9 8

The actual question is that I don't know how exactly to call my problem, so I had difficulty searching for it.

  • Are there other algorithms for accomplishing such a task?
  • How are they called? Maybe the names would come if I knew other areas of application.

I needed the algorithm as a part of a bigger algorithm for clustering of data. I think it could also be useful for implementing a parallel sort(?).

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

If your language has integer division that truncates, an easy way to compute the size of section i is via (N*i+N)/M - (N*i)/M. For example, the python program

  N=100;M=12
  for i in range(M): print (N*i+N)/M - (N*i)/M

outputs the numbers 8 8 9 8 8 9 8 8 9 8 8 9. With N=12;M=5 it outputs 2 2 3 2 3. With N=12;M=3 it outputs 4 4 4.

If your section numbers are 1-based rather than 0-based, the expression is instead (N*i)/M - (N*i-N)/M.

share|improve this answer
    
Simple and great! Thanks! –  Angel Sinigersky Nov 10 '11 at 18:52
    
It should be noted that my implementation given in the question has an additional "feature": the interval lengths are "symmetrical" with respect to the middle of the array. For the example N = 100, M = 12 you get: 8 9 8 8 9 8 8 9 8 8 9 8 –  Angel Sinigersky Nov 10 '11 at 20:43

Space-filling-curves and fractals subdivide the plane and reduce the complexity. There is for example z-curve, hilbert curve, morton curve.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.