Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is it possible to set the next value of an autoincrement field in SQL Server like you can do in Postgres?

For the curious, here's the whole backstory. My company used to use Postgres, which allows you to easily set the next value of an autoincrement field to an arbitrary value.

New company bought old company, and now we're importing Postgres data to SQL Server. Somehow the autoincremented AcctID field on Accounts got set to a 9-digit number even though there are thousands of 8 digit numbers to be had. Apparently someone did this a while back in Postgres for some now unknown reason.

So now in the new SQL Server database, new accounts are having 9-digit account ids, but the client's accounting software can't deal with 9-digit account numbers, so any new accounts they add can't be processed by their accounting department until this gets resolved.

Of course, there are up to 72 different tables which can have dependencies on the AcctID field of Accounts, and the client created about 360 new accounts before they realized the problems involved, so saving that data, truncating the table, and reinserting the data would be an onerous task.

Much better would be to set the autoincrement value of AcctID to the last 8-digit value + 1. Then at least they'd be able to add new accounts while a solution to the 9-digit accounts was being worked on. In fact they claim they only need 3 of the 360 accounts they've added.

So is it possible to reset the autoincrement value of a field in SQL Server like you can do in Postgres?

share|improve this question
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 8 down vote accepted

In SQL Server you can reset an autoincrement column like this:

dbcc checkident ( table_name, RESEED, new_value )

You can check MSDN's documentation about it here.

share|improve this answer
    
But for this column the Identity Specification is NO, and there's no Identity Increment or Identity Seed. Will CheckIdent still work in that case? –  mutatron Nov 10 '11 at 18:57
3  
No, it won't. AFAIK the only way do declare an autoincrement column in MSSQL is by means of an identity column. If its identity specification is no, how is it autoincrementing? I'm a little puzzled. We are talking about Microsoft's SQL Server, right? –  ssarabando Nov 10 '11 at 19:02
1  
I would venture to say that this is being managed in a trigger or some other mechanism outside of SQL server. I can think of two products in particular that work in this fashion, one via triggers and one via an external management server which allocated the next number. Both are based on an application specific next number table. If it is not an identity column, can you elaborate on any triggers or external service dependencies which might contribute to this? If it is a commercial product, what is it? –  Tevo D Nov 10 '11 at 19:22
    
Aha, I've found it. The account ids are not unique in the Account table, but they are unique in the account type tables, like MemberAccounts or MeetingAccounts. Each account type has its own index, and it's the indices in those tables that are identities. So when a new MemberAccount is created, its AcctID is autoincremented and then that id is inserted into the Accounts table. So CheckIdent will work, but only on the account type tables, not on the main Accounts table. –  mutatron Nov 10 '11 at 20:19
add comment

You can do this too:

CREATE TABLE #myTable
    (
      ID INT IDENTITY,
      abc VARCHAR(20)
    )

INSERT  INTO #myTable
        SELECT  'abc'
        UNION ALL
        SELECT  'abc'
        UNION ALL
        SELECT  'abc'
        UNION ALL
        SELECT  'abc'
        UNION ALL
        SELECT  'abc'
        UNION ALL
        SELECT  'abc'
        UNION ALL
        SELECT  'abc'
        UNION ALL
        SELECT  'abc'
        UNION ALL
        SELECT  'cba'

SELECT  *
FROM    #myTable 

-- Jump Identities
SET IDENTITY_INSERT #myTable  ON
INSERT  INTO #myTable
        ( id, abc )
VALUES  ( 50, 'cbd' )

SELECT  *
FROM    #myTable 
SET IDENTITY_INSERT #myTable  OFF

-- Back to contigious
INSERT  INTO #myTable
        SELECT  'abc'
        UNION ALL
        SELECT  'abc'
        UNION ALL
        SELECT  'abc'
        UNION ALL
        SELECT  'abc'
        UNION ALL
        SELECT  'abc'
        UNION ALL
        SELECT  'abc'
        UNION ALL
        SELECT  'abc'
        UNION ALL
        SELECT  'abc'
        UNION ALL
        SELECT  'cba'

SELECT  *
FROM    #myTable 
DROP TABLE #myTable 
share|improve this answer
1  
Yes, but that also requires an identity column (am I right?), and mutatron says it has none. –  ssarabando Nov 10 '11 at 20:11
    
it is the only way to autoincrement w/o a trigger. If it's trigger based then he shouldn't have any restrictions to inserting whatever he wants. –  Dan Andrews Nov 15 '11 at 15:18
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.