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Ok, I manage my own App.Config. I don't need a wizard to do it for me, thank you very much. And the code that it puts in my App.Config is verbose garbage. I am capable of writing my own WCF endpoints and bindings. I just want Visual Studio 2010 to do what it is best at doing: code generation. Just give me the server and data-contract code! Is there any way to turn this off? Is there a way to call 'Update Service Reference' without VS changing the App.Config? Its very frustrating. Now it gives me an exception unless I completely delete all of the endpoint nodes from my App.Config.

This is the exception that I get:

There was an error downloading 'http://localhost:8732/MyService/mex'.

The request failed with HTTP status 400: Bad Request.

A child element named 'endpoint' with same key already exists at the same configuration scope. Collection elements must be unique within the same configuration scope (e.g. the same application.config file). Duplicate key value: 'contractType:Web.DataService.MyService.IMyService;name:MyService.Live'. (C:\ProjectPath\App.config line 152)

And here is my App.Config:

<system.serviceModel>
    <bindings>
        <wsHttpBinding>
            <binding name="Binding.Debug" maxReceivedMessageSize="2147483647">
            </binding>
            <binding name="Binding.Secure" maxReceivedMessageSize="2147483647">
                <security mode="Transport">
                    <transport clientCredentialType="None"/>
                </security>
            </binding>
        </wsHttpBinding>
    </bindings>
    <client>
        <!-- Debug client endpoints -->

        <endpoint name="MyService.Debug"
                  contract="Web.DataService.MyService.IMyService" 
                  address="http://localhost:8732/MyService"
                  binding="wsHttpBinding"
                  bindingConfiguration="Binding.Debug"
                  />
        <endpoint name="MyService1.Debug"
                  contract="Web.DataService.MyService1.IMyService1" 
                  address="http://localhost:8732/MyService1"
                  binding="wsHttpBinding"
                  bindingConfiguration="Binding.Debug"
                  />
        <endpoint name="MyService2.Debug"
                  contract="Web.DataService.MyService2.IMyService2"
                  address="http://localhost:8732/MyService2"
                  binding="wsHttpBinding"
                  bindingConfiguration="Binding.Debug"
                  />
        <endpoint name="MyService3.Debug"
                  contract="Web.DataService.MyService3.IMyService3"
                  address="http://localhost:8732/MyService3"
                  binding="wsHttpBinding"
                  bindingConfiguration="Binding.Debug"
                  />

        <!-- Local client endpoints -->

        <endpoint name="MyService.Local"
                  contract="Web.DataService.MyService.IMyService" 
                  address="https://www.mydomain.com/MyVirtualDirectory.Local/MyService.svc"
                  binding="wsHttpBinding"
                  bindingConfiguration="Binding.Secure"
                  />
        <endpoint name="MyService1.Local"
                  contract="Web.DataService.MyService1.IMyService1" 
                  address="https://www.mydomain.com/MyVirtualDirectory.Local/MyService1.svc"
                  binding="wsHttpBinding"
                  bindingConfiguration="Binding.Secure"
                  />
        <endpoint name="MyService2.Local"
                  contract="Web.DataService.MyService2.IMyService2"
                  address="https://www.mydomain.com/MyVirtualDirectory.Local/MyService2.svc"
                  binding="wsHttpBinding"
                  bindingConfiguration="Binding.Secure"
                  />
        <endpoint name="MyService3.Local"
                  contract="Web.DataService.MyService3.IMyService3"
                  address="https://www.mydomain.com/MyVirtualDirectory.Local/MyService3.svc"
                  binding="wsHttpBinding"
                  bindingConfiguration="Binding.Secure"
                  />

        <!-- Beta client endpoints -->

        <endpoint name="MyService.Beta"
                  contract="Web.DataService.MyService.IMyService"
                  address="https://www.mydomain.com/MyVirtualDirectory.Beta/MyService.svc"
                  binding="wsHttpBinding"
                  bindingConfiguration="Binding.Secure"
                  />
        <endpoint name="MyService1.Beta"
                  contract="Web.DataService.MyService1.IMyService1"
                  address="https://www.mydomain.com/MyVirtualDirectory.Beta/MyService1.svc"
                  binding="wsHttpBinding"
                  bindingConfiguration="Binding.Secure"
                  />
        <endpoint name="MyService2.Beta"
                  contract="Web.DataService.MyService2.IMyService2"
                  address="https://www.mydomain.com/MyVirtualDirectory.Beta/MyService2.svc"
                  binding="wsHttpBinding"
                  bindingConfiguration="Binding.Secure"
                  />
        <endpoint name="MyService3.Beta"
                  contract="Web.DataService.MyService3.IMyService3"
                  address="https://www.mydomain.com/MyVirtualDirectory.Beta/MyService3.svc"
                  binding="wsHttpBinding"
                  bindingConfiguration="Binding.Secure"
                  />

        <!-- Live client endpoints -->

        <endpoint name="MyService.Live"
                  contract="Web.DataService.MyService.IMyService"
                  address="https://www.mydomain.com/MyVirtualDirectory/MyService.svc"
                  binding="wsHttpBinding"
                  bindingConfiguration="Binding.Secure"
                  />
        <endpoint name="MyService1.Live"
                  contract="Web.DataService.MyService1.IMyService1"
                  address="https://www.mydomain.com/MyVirtualDirectory/MyService1.svc"
                  binding="wsHttpBinding"
                  bindingConfiguration="Binding.Secure"
                  />
        <endpoint name="MyService2.Live"
                  contract="Web.DataService.MyService2.IMyService2"
                  address="https://www.mydomain.com/MyVirtualDirectory/MyService2.svc"
                  binding="wsHttpBinding"
                  bindingConfiguration="Binding.Secure"
                  />
        <endpoint name="MyService3.Live"
                  contract="Web.DataService.MyService3.IMyService3"
                  address="https://www.mydomain.com/MyVirtualDirectory/MyService3.svc"
                  binding="wsHttpBinding"
                  bindingConfiguration="Binding.Secure"
                  />
    </client>
</system.serviceModel>

This is very frustrating!

Edits:

I've figured out the exception that I was getting. I had MyService2.Live twice. I fixed this and no longer get the exception. I'd still like to know if I can keep VS10 from changing my App.Config.

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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You could use the svcutil tool to generate the files and manually merge them with the ones you have modified.

p.s: use slsvcutil if your client is Silverlight

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I know. I could also write my own proxy classes. But I'd rather just use the VS10 Update Web Service. –  Jordan Nov 10 '11 at 18:59
    
I'm not telling you to write your own proxy classes, all I'm saying is use a generator the same way Visual Studio does but you decide what to merge from the generated code into your files. –  sebagomez Nov 10 '11 at 19:43
    
No, I know. You are right. I'm just being lazy. Maybe I can find a way to automate it. My client has me doing a lot of build and fix stuff so I'm having to update my (generated) proxy four or five times a day. –  Jordan Nov 10 '11 at 21:02
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My solutions for the problem ('Update service reference' takes 2 seconds ... svcutil with manual copy paste takes 30 seconds and too much alt-tabs):

  • If you're on source control (e.g. TFS) ... check in the app or web.config before updating. Then run 'Update service reference'. This will automatically check out the config file. After the update, just 'Undo checkout' from source control should put the original one back, but the generated reference code will be updated.
  • If not on source control: Open the app or web.config file, select all text (ctrl+a), copy (ctrl+c), update service reference, select all text in the config file again (ctrl+a), paste (ctrl+v).

It takes a few seconds longer, but still less of a hazard than using svcutil, which to be honest I only use when adding a service in the IDE fails and I need some info the dialog won't give me.

Sidenote: If you're adding a service, you should manually add the correct bindings and endpoints for your new service ofcourse.

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An even easier solution is to have the App.Config file open in Visual Studio and then switch to that file and Ctrl+Z it back each time. It works. I was looking for a more automatic solution (i.e. keeping it from rewriting it altogether. :) –  Jordan Aug 5 '13 at 13:48
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