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I just merged changes from our maintenance branch into our development branch. (We branch by cloning the mercurial repository, not with named branches.) There were a few conflicts, so I had to manually edit a half a dozen lines or so to resolve the merge conflict. No big deal. But when I look at the merge commit, I see the bazillion lines from the entire stack of patches against one parent or the other, not the merge conflict.

How can I review just the conflict and its resolution?

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3 Answers

It sounds like you want the MergeDiff extension.

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Quite possibly. Would have to patch it up before I can tell. bitbucket.org/wolever/hg-mergediff/issue/3/… –  keturn Nov 16 '11 at 0:14
    
After making the changes suggested in that ticket, mergediff displays some unexpected results. –  keturn Nov 16 '11 at 0:54
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hg -n annotate probably?

Or, better annotate -n .. | grep 'hg tip --template "{rev}\n"'. You know changeset number of mergeset, your edits will have this number (automerged string will get number of latest change)

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Oh, I see what you're saying, annotate the file at the merge and grep for lines that were changed... Yeah, that works, but it's relatively slow. It'd need to at least be narrowed down to the set of files touched in the merge, annotating everything in the repository is super expensive. –  keturn Nov 16 '11 at 0:06
    
blame -r N (only one revision's files used)? –  Lazy Badger Nov 16 '11 at 0:16
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When I want to do this, I redo the merge with ui.merge=internal:merge so I get all the conflict markers. Then I diff it against the merge changeset. A bit clumsy, but it works.

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