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I have an internal counter that counts from 0-999999999999.

I would like this to display as a number between 0-9999, then rollover again.

This means:

  • 0 displays as 1
  • 1 displays as 2
  • 9998 displays as 9999
  • ...
  • 9999 displays as 1
  • 10000 displays as 2
  • ...
  • 19999 displays as 1
  • 20000 displays as 2

edit:

1 + $number % 9999 was the answer (Thanks @Brad Christie). My table of expected results is wrong. (Thanks @Tevo D)

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1  
What have you done so far? –  djdy Nov 10 '11 at 19:01
6  
Have you heard of the modulo (%) operator? –  dialer Nov 10 '11 at 19:02
    
@djdy, modulo, but I'm having trouble finding an elegant answer that performs consistently across all numbers. –  Jareb Shubway Nov 10 '11 at 19:13
1  
What do you mean by "increasingly large remainders"? % is remainder after division, and is always 0..modulus-1 –  Bob Kaufman Nov 10 '11 at 19:21

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted
$x = 9280293;
$baseNineNineNineNine = $x % 9999;

Use MOD, it will give you the remainder past 9999 (e.g. Any number divided by 9999 can go in N times, with a remainder of Y (you'll end up with Y as a value)

For the numbers you're looking for, you may want to +1 any value you get after the MOD (%), or use 10000

See also the Modulus Operator

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Example found here: ideone.com/SfIhv –  Brad Christie Nov 10 '11 at 19:04
    
@JarebShubway: I'm not sure I get the pattern then. X % 9999 + 1 gives you what you want, with the 1999 & 20000 edge-cases being the exception. What makes those two numbers special? (See this example) –  Brad Christie Nov 10 '11 at 19:16

Take reminder with 10000, that guarantees the result to be in between 0 and 9999 and rolls over

$result = $int % 10000;
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using % 10000 will turn numbers like 20000 into 0, which is not what I want. Adding +1 will turn 9999 into 10000, which is also not what I want. –  Jareb Shubway Nov 10 '11 at 19:12

Your table of values doesn't match what you asking for. In the example you are using 9999 result values (1-9999) for 10000 input values. In the text you are saying 10000 output values (0-9999).

Here is what I think you are really asking for. This algorithm will output 1-9999 and then roll over to 1 again.

In other words, this solution will provide a four digit non-zero value:

$result = $int % 9999 + 1;

The output will NOT match your example, as your example has it rolling over every 10000 values, not 9999. Here is the output:

input   output
0       1
1       2
....      ....
9997      9998
9998      9999
9999      1       <--- 9999 * 1
10000     2
....      ....
19996     9998
19997     9999
19998     1       <--- 9999 * 2
19999     2
....      ....
19995     9998
19996     9999
19997     1       <--- 9999 * 3
19998     2
....      ....
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Point taken and good job being the only one to recognize this. Looks like you're right! –  Jareb Shubway Nov 10 '11 at 19:40

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