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Using Rails I'm trying to get an error message like "The song field can't be empty" on save. Doing the following:

validates_presence_of :song_rep_xyz, :message => "can't be empty"

... only displays "Song Rep XYW can't be empty", which is not good because the title of the field is not user friendly. How can I change the title of the field itself ? I could change the actual name of the field in the database, but I have multiple "song" fields and I do need to have specific field names.

I don't want to hack around rails' validation process and I feel there should be a way of fixing that.

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9 Answers

up vote 205 down vote accepted

Now, the accepted way to set the humanized names and custom error messages is to use locales.

# config/locales/en.yml
en:
  activerecord:
    attributes:
      user:
        email: "E-mail address"
    errors:
      models:
        user:
          attributes:
            email:
              blank: "is required"

Now the humanized name and the presence validation message for the "email" attribute have been changed.

Validation messages can be set for a specific model+attribute, model, attribute, or globally.

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2  
Setting field names by language is great, but how does one set a custom error messages by language? –  Jared Brown Jan 30 '11 at 16:49
10  
If you are using mongoid, replace activerecord: with mongoid: –  Intentss Nov 6 '11 at 14:07
77  
@graywh: Where should questions about an answer be posted, if not in the comments? Here's the I18n guide: guides.rubyonrails.org/i18n.html –  Tyler Rick Dec 15 '11 at 20:45
3  
By the way: if you pass a symbol in for the message parameter of your validator in Rails 3.1.3, it will tell you the scope it was looking for as it won't e found, so you know exactly what to put in your locales yml. –  aceofspades Feb 14 '12 at 5:46
2  
Well, this is fine and all, but what if naively prepending the column name (no matter how human readable it is) would lead to completely f-uped grammar (especially in non-english languages)? Do I really need to use errors.add :base, msg? I'd like to know which column the error is about, so I can display it at the correct form field. –  panzi Feb 27 '13 at 18:34
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Try this.

class User < ActiveRecord::Base
  validate do |user|
    user.errors.add_to_base("Country can't be blank") if user.country_iso.blank?
  end
end

I found this here.

Here is another way to do it. What you do is define a human_attribute_name method on the model class. The method is passed the column name as a string and returns the string to use in validation messages.

class User < ActiveRecord::Base

  HUMANIZED_ATTRIBUTES = {
    :email => "E-mail address"
  }

  def self.human_attribute_name(attr)
    HUMANIZED_ATTRIBUTES[attr.to_sym] || super
  end

end

The above code is from here

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The problem is that my field is called :song_rep_xyz (well, something complicated), which is not user friendly –  marcgg Apr 30 '09 at 20:11
    
I just edited the question to be clearer –  marcgg Apr 30 '09 at 20:13
    
Nice, thanks for this! –  Yar Jun 3 '09 at 0:14
12  
for Rails 3, "def self.human_attribute_name(attr)" needs to be changed into "def self.human_attribute_name(attr, options={})", otherwise it returns an error –  spacemonkey Nov 24 '10 at 10:18
    
works fine!...thanks –  justcode Oct 13 '12 at 9:24
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In your model:

validates_presence_of :address1, :message => "Put some address please" 

In your view

<% m.errors.each do |attr,msg|  %>
 <%=msg%>
<% end %>

If you do instead

<%=attr %> <%=msg %>

you get this error message with the attribute name

address1 Put some address please

if you want to get the error message for one single attribute

<%= @model.errors[:address1] %>
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That's not an acceptable solution. What if I want the default behaviour for all the other attributes (attr + msg)? –  Romulo Ceccon Feb 20 '13 at 17:45
    
There you go.. you can play with those 2 things and make it work –  Federico Feb 21 '13 at 18:44
    
great solution Feds –  Mild Fuzz Mar 7 '13 at 21:26
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Yes, there's a way to do this whithout the plugin! But I is not as clean and elegant as using the mentioned plugin. Here it is.

Assuming it's Rails 3 (I don't know if it's different in previous versions),

keep this in your model:

validates_presence_of :song_rep_xyz, :message => "can't be empty"

and in the view, instead of leaving

@instance.errors.full_messages

as it would be when we use the scaffold generator, put:

@instance.errors.first[1]

And you will get just the message you especified in the model, without the attribute name.

Explanation:

#returns an hash of messages, one element foreach field error, in this particular case would be just one element in the hash:
@instance.errors  # => {:song_rep_xyz=>"can't be empty"}

#this returns the first element of the hash as an array like [:key,"value"]
@instance.errors.first # => [:song_rep_xyz, "can't be empty"]

#by doing the following, you are telleing ruby to take just the second element of that array, wich is the message.
@instance.errors.first[1]

So far we are just displaying only one message, always for the first error. If you wanna display all erros you can loop in the hash and show the values.

Hope that helped.

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I recommend installing the custom_error_message gem (or as a plugin) originally written by David Easley

It lets you do stuff like:

validates_presence_of :non_friendly_field_name, :message => "^Friendly field name is blank"
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thanks! isn't there a way to do it without a plugin ? –  marcgg Apr 30 '09 at 21:00
    
I have used this plugin in the past with great success though it does not appear to be regularly maintained anymore. –  Jared Brown Jan 30 '11 at 16:48
1  
you can alse install it as a gem for rails 3. just add gem "custom_error_message" to your Gemfile - see github for more details –  Dorian May 2 '12 at 14:21
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Rails3 Code with fully localized messages:

In the model user.rb define the validation

validates :email, :presence => true

In config/locales/en.yml

en:  
  activerecord:
    models: 
      user: "Customer"
    attributes:
      user:
        email: "Email address"
    errors:
      models:
        user:
          attributes:
            email:
              blank: "cannot be empty"
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In the custom validation method use:

errors.add(:base, "Custom error message")

as add_to_base has been deprecated.

errors.add_to_base("Custom error message")

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If you want to list them all in a nice list but without using the cruddy non human friendly name, you can do this...

object.errors.each do |attr,message|
  puts "<li>"+message+"</li>"
end
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Just do it the normal way:

validates_presence_of :email, :message => "Email is required."

But display it like this instead

<% if @user.errors.any? %>
  <% @user.errors.messages.each do |message| %>
    <div class="message"><%= message.last.last.html_safe %></div>
  <% end %>
<% end %>

Returns

"Email is required."

The localization method is definitely the "proper" way to do this, but if you're doing a little, non-global project and want to just get going fast - this is definitely easier than file hopping.

I like it for the ability to put the field name somewhere other than the beginning of the string:

validates_uniqueness_of :email, :message => "There is already an account with that email."
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