Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

First time posting, I will try to adhere to best practices.

I'm trying to construct a MySQL query that measures a user's location (represented in the query as $Lat and $Lng for latitude and longtitude, respectively). The query should return the 50 stations in closest proximity to the user.

The problem is that the data in my table contains the location of each station entrance per station and I only need the closest station entrance per station!

This is my query:

SELECT id, lat, lng, station_name, routes,
  ( 3959 * acos( cos( radians($Lat) )
  * cos( radians( lat ) ) * cos( radians( lng ) -
  radians($Lng) ) + sin( radians($Lat) ) * sin( radians( lat ) ) ) )  AS distance
FROM subway_stations ORDER BY distance LIMIT 0 , 50;

The Above MySQL query accomplishes the following:

  1. Selects the data from id, lat, lng, station_name and routes
  2. Measures lat and lng of each station with that of the user - storing that data as 'distance'
  3. Returns the 50 nearest results

I need to group these results together so that only one record per station is returned, the one with the lowest value in the distance column, which is the station entrance closest to the user.

I've tried using GROUP BY but I seem to be implementing it incorrectly as the results returned were not the desired ones.

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

It's hard to know without setting up a sample database, but I suspect that you want to make the following changes:

  1. Add a group by station_name, id, lat, lng to the end of your query

  2. All select fields which are not a part of the group by clause need an aggregating function. Most obviously, distance should needs a min(...)

  3. I'm not sure if the order and limit clause can be used. If you have problems, take them out (temporarily) and get this much working. For my convenience, call this query Q1.

  4. If the order by and limit clause cannot be used (experiment and see), then you want a nested query. That will look something like select * from (...Q1...) t1 ORDER BY distance LIMIT 0,50. The t1 assigned a temporary name to the inner select, not actually used in this query, but required for syntax.

  5. As an optimization, you may want to add a having clause to the inner Q1 query. That is, add HAVING distance<XXXXX, if you know a bounding distance.

Note that steps 3 -- 5 may not be needed, I'm not sure about step 3.

share|improve this answer
    
If you add a 'group by station_name, id, lat, lng' to the query, it'll essentially be the same as not grouping at all. –  Sam Dufel Nov 10 '11 at 20:44
    
I had assumed that station_name uniquely defined id, lat, lng, with id as the probable primary key. But rereading the original question it seems like id probably refers to the individual entrance. So you're probably right. I'm re-considering. –  Pursuit Nov 10 '11 at 23:54
    
@Sam It looks like your answer is correct. You just need to add the order by and limit clauses to answer the original question. (My reputation isn't high enough yet to make this comment on your question where it belongs). –  Pursuit Nov 11 '11 at 0:20
    
#2 of the numbered list above provided me with a solution and #5 added optimization to my query, thanks! –  Dave Roma Nov 12 '11 at 0:48

If you only need one smallest record for each station, you don't need LIMIT.. Just do

$result = mysql_query("SELECT id, lat, lng, station_name, routes, MIN(
    ( 3959 * acos( cos( radians($Lat) ) * cos( radians( lat ) ) * 
    cos( radians( lng ) - radians($Lng) ) + sin( radians($Lat) ) * 
    sin( radians( lat ) ) ) ) AS distance )
FROM subway_stations 
GROUP BY station_name;

This will return only one record per station with the smallest distance.

share|improve this answer
    
This won't work. When you select fields which are not specified in the GROUP BY clause, the result is undefined - you'll get a result from an arbitrary row. –  Sam Dufel Nov 10 '11 at 20:35

You might have an easier time getting the closest entrance per station with php.

This is actually a common problem, which you'll need to use a subquery to solve. I'm assuming that id is just a row ID, and not unique to each station.

SELECT subway_stations.* FROM (
    SELECT station_name, MIN(
        ( 3959 * acos( cos( radians($Lat) ) * cos( radians( lat ) ) * 
        cos( radians( lng ) - radians($Lng) ) + sin( radians($Lat) ) * 
        sin( radians( lat ) ) ) )
    ) AS distance 
    FROM subway_stations 
    GROUP BY station_name
) AS min_distances
JOIN subway_stations ON (
    min_distances.station_name = subway_stations.station_name
    AND ( 3959 * acos( cos( radians($Lat) ) * cos( radians( lat ) ) * 
        cos( radians( lng ) - radians($Lng) ) + sin( radians($Lat) ) * 
        sin( radians( lat ) ) ) 
    ) = min_distances.distance
)

This is the typical 'pure mysql' solution to your problem. However, because of the degree of calculations involved in getting the distance, you might want to either: - use your initial query, and get the shortest distance for each station with php OR - run the inner query above, but insert its results into a temp table, then do the equivalent of the above query, except with the calculated distance replaced by the calculated distance from the temporary table.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.